Toward rational selection criteria for selection of probiotics in pigs

Adv Appl Microbiol. 2019:107:83-112. doi: 10.1016/bs.aambs.2019.03.003. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Abstract

An accurate understanding of properties of probiotics is a prerequisite for selecting probiotic organisms for use in swine production. This review aims to review selection criteria for probiotic organism in swine. The systematically investigated ecological history rather than the source of isolates should be regarded as the natural origin of probiotic strains, which helps to correct the inconsistencies arising from incorrect identification of the source. Moreover, in vivo studies are suggested as follow-up assessment to validate the characteristics of probiotic predicted by in vitro experiments. In addition, the intended probiotic effect depends on the age of the animal and disease prevention in young animals may require different probiotic strains when compared to growth promotion in older animals. With adequate selection criteria, the inclusion of probiotic in feed supplementation is a promising way to exert positive effects on sows, newborns, weanling animals and grower-finisher pigs. Both host-adapted probiotics and nomadic probiotics can be applied for pathogen inhibition but host adapted organisms appear to have a different mode of action. Host-adapted probiotic strains are likely to be associated with exclusive colonization while the nomadic or environmental strain exert better immune stimulating functions. Strains with potent enzymatic activity are fitter for grower pigs favoring feed digestion and enhancing growth performance.

Keywords: Host adaptation; Intestinal microbiome swine; Lactobacillus reuteri; Probiotics; Selection criteria probiotics.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animal Husbandry / methods*
  • Animals
  • Dietary Supplements
  • Gastrointestinal Tract / microbiology*
  • Probiotics / administration & dosage*
  • Probiotics / isolation & purification*
  • Swine / growth & development*
  • Swine Diseases / prevention & control