Relationship between severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia and severe retinopathy of prematurity in premature newborns

J AAPOS. 2019 Aug;23(4):209.e1-209.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaapos.2019.02.008. Epub 2019 May 24.

Abstract

Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are two adverse sequelae of preterm birth associated with abnormal vascular development. The purpose of this study was to characterize the relationship between these two outcomes at a single institution.

Methods: The medical records of infants screened for ROP at the University of Colorado Hospital between January 2012 and December 2017 were reviewed retrospectively. ROP was classified according to Early Treatment Retinopathy of Prematurity (ET-ROP) criteria; BPD, according to the 2010 Criteria from the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development. We examined the relationship between moderate-severe BPD and the development of severe ROP (type 1 or 2) using univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression with the odds ratio as a measure of association. Covariates included gestational age and birth weight at delivery.

Results: A total of 625 cases were reviewed. Of these, 64 infants (10%) developed severe ROP and 176 (28%) infants developed moderate-severe BPD. We found a significant relationship between these two outcomes following adjustments for gestational age, birth weight, and multiparity (OR = 3.2; 95% CI, 1.6-6.5 [P < 0.01]).

Conclusions: In our cohort of preterm infants, we found a significant relationship between moderate-severe BPD with severe ROP. We hypothesize that these two neonatal outcomes have links with a common pathogenesis.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Abnormalities, Multiple*
  • Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia / diagnosis*
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Gestational Age
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Infant, Premature*
  • Male
  • Retinopathy of Prematurity / diagnosis*
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Severity of Illness Index