Secondary Surgery Rates After Primary Fusion for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

Orthopedics. 2019 Jul 1;42(4):235-239. doi: 10.3928/01477447-20190523-02. Epub 2019 May 28.

Abstract

Instrumented spinal fusion is the gold standard treatment for surgical magnitude adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), with the goal being stable fusion without the need for additional procedures. The purpose of this study was to define the surgical return rates of AIS at a single center with respect to various instrumentation constructs used during initial spinal fusion. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients with AIS who underwent instrumented fusion with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Demographic information, implant type, and surgical approach for the primary surgery and all subsequent secondary operations were recorded. Four hundred eleven patients who underwent instrumented fusion for AIS during the study period met inclusion criteria. Sixty-six secondary operations were performed in 50 patients (12.2%). Symptomatic hardware, pseudarthrosis, and infection were the most common indications for secondary surgery. Posterior pedicle screw constructs had a lower secondary surgery rate (5.8%) compared with hybrid and combined fusions (P<.05). The all hook, hybrid, anterior only, and combined fusions had secondary surgery rates of 13.0%, 18.5%, 10.0%, and 20.8%, respectively, which were not statistically different. When specifically comparing pedicle screw with hook constructs, there was a statistically lower pseudarthrosis rate (P=.03) favoring pedicle screw instrumentation. Patients undergoing instrumented fusion for AIS are at some risk for subsequent surgery. To lessen that risk, pedicle screw constructs should be considered, as they have shown an overall lower secondary surgery rate and in particular a lower rate of pseudarthrosis. [Orthopedics. 2019; 42(4):235-239.].

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Pedicle Screws*
  • Reoperation / statistics & numerical data*
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Scoliosis / surgery*
  • Spinal Fusion / methods*
  • Thoracic Vertebrae / surgery*
  • Treatment Outcome