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The Effect of Exercise Order in Circuit Training on Muscular Strength and Functional Fitness in Older Women

The Effect of Exercise Order in Circuit Training on Muscular Strength and Functional Fitness in Older Women

Diogo Correia Cardozo et al. Int J Exerc Sci.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of different orders of exercises in circuit training on strength and functional fitness in older women over a 12-week period. After 10 repetition maximum (10-RM) and functional fitness baseline testing, thirty older women were randomly assigned into two groups. The exercise order for Group 1 was leg press, wide-grip lat pulldown, knee extension, pec deck fly, plantar flexion and triceps extension; Group 2 performed the same exercises, but in the opposite order: triceps extension, plantar flexion, pec deck fly, knee extension, wide-grip lat pulldown and leg press. Both groups performed the circuit three times with a load that permitted 8 to 10 repetitions per exercise set. Both groups exhibited gains in 10-RM strength and functional fitness test performance (p ≤ 0.05). In Comparing groups, the G1 presented greater strength gains for the wide-grip lat pulldown, while G2 showed higher values for the plantar flexion and triceps extension exercises (p ≤ 0.05). Both circuit exercise orders were effective and could be applied to promote strength and functional fitness gains. However, based on the results for the wide-grip lat pulldown, plantar flexion and triceps extension, it seems that exercise order should be considered when specific muscle weaknesses are a priority, so that these muscles are trained first within a circuit.

Keywords: Resistance; performance; recovery; strength; training.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
10-RM (Mean and SD) of LP, WP, PF and TE exercises for G1 (n=15) and G2 (n=15) at baseline and at 12 weeks of RT. # Trial effect; *Group X trial interactions.

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