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, 42 (7), 1217-1224

BMI, Weight Change, and Dementia Risk in Patients With New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Cohort Study

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BMI, Weight Change, and Dementia Risk in Patients With New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Cohort Study

Ga Eun Nam et al. Diabetes Care.

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the association between baseline BMI, percentage weight change, and the risk of dementia in patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Research design and methods: Using the South Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Health Screening Cohort database, we identified 167,876 subjects aged ≥40 years diagnosed with new-onset type 2 diabetes between 2007 and 2012. Their weight changes were monitored for ∼2 years after diagnosis, with follow-up assessments occurring for an average of 3.5 years. The hazard ratios (HRs) and Bonferroni-adjusted 95% CIs of all-cause dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD), and vascular dementia were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models.

Results: We identified 2,563 incident dementia cases during follow-up. Baseline BMI among patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes was inversely associated with the risk of all-cause dementia and AD, independent of confounding variables (P for trend <0.001). The percentage weight change during the 2 years after a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes showed significant U-shaped associations with the risk of all-cause dementia development (P < 0.001); the HRs of the disease increased significantly when weight loss or gain was >10% (1.34 [95% CI 1.11-1.63] and 1.38 [1.08-1.76], respectively). Additionally, weight loss >10% was associated with an increased risk of AD (HR 1.26 [95% CI 1.01-1.59]).

Conclusions: A lower baseline BMI was associated with increased risks of all-cause dementia and AD in patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes. Weight loss or weight gain after the diagnosis of diabetes was associated with an increased risk of all-cause dementia. Weight loss was associated with an increased risk of AD.

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