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, 9 (1), 8515

Relationship Between Age, BMI, Head Posture and Superficial Neck Muscle Stiffness and Elasticity in Adult Women

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Relationship Between Age, BMI, Head Posture and Superficial Neck Muscle Stiffness and Elasticity in Adult Women

Piotr Kocur et al. Sci Rep.

Abstract

This study determined relationships between age, BMI and cranio-vertebral angle (CVA) (independent variables) and stiffness and elasticity of sternocleidomasteoid [SCM] and upper trapezius [UT] (dependent variables) muscles in sitting posture in 95 women across adult life. Moreover, a stepwise regression was performed to determine to what extent the dependent variables are explained by age, BMI and CVA. Age was moderately correlated with BMI (r = 0.41), and both age and BMI were moderately negatively correlated with CVA (r = -0.54 and -0.55, respectively). High (r = 0.73) and moderate (r = 0.53) linear relationships were present between age and logarithmic decrement (inversely related to elasticity) and stiffness of SCM muscle, respectively. Low (r = 0.36) and moderate (r = 0.47) relationships were present between age and logarithmic decrement and stiffness of UT muscle, respectively. Age accounted for 53% variance in elasticity and 28.5% variance in stiffness of SCM, and for 13% variance in elasticity and 22% variance in stiffness of UT muscle. Introduction of BMI but not CVA to the model explained the variance of these parameters by additional 0-8%. Among the studied factors age is the major correlate of stiffness and elasticity of neck muscles across the adult life.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no competing interests.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
MyotonPro measurement point on the UT muscle.
Figure 2
Figure 2
MyotonPro measurement point on the SCM muscle.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Example of raw acceleration signal from the upper trapezius muscle of one participant obtained with MyotonPro.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Elasticity (log. decr.) of UT (A) and SCM (B) muscles.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Stiffness of UT (A) and SCM (B) muscles.

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