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Meta-Analysis
. 2019 Jul;98(28):e16404.
doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000016404.

Fruits and Vegetables Consumption and the Risk of Gallstone Diasease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Free PMC article
Meta-Analysis

Fruits and Vegetables Consumption and the Risk of Gallstone Diasease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Jun-Wei Zhang et al. Medicine (Baltimore). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: The role of fruit and vegetables (FVs) consumption in decreasing gallstone disease risk remains contradictory. We performed a meta-analysis to analyze this potential correlation, followed by investigation of dose-response relationship of FVs consumption with gallstone disease.

Materials and methods: PubMed, Embase, as well as Web of Science were searched to determine all published researches about the connection of FVs consumption with gallstone disease before March 2018. Relative risks (RRs) or odds ratios (ORs) along with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was pooled utilizing random effect models, aiming at examining the correlation of FVs consumption with gallstone disease risk.

Results: One cross-sectional study, our case-control studies as well as nine cohort studies were enrolled, covering approximately 33,983 patients with gallstone disease and 1,53,3752 participants. In a pooled analysis, vegetables consumption was significantly related to a decreased gallstone disease risk, (RR = 0.83, 95% CI, 0.74-0.94, I = 91.1%), and for fruits consumption, RR was similar (RR = 0.88, 95%CI, 0.83-0.92, I = 0.01%). This inverse correlation of FVs consumption with gallstone disease risk was solid in most subgroup analysis. The nonlinear dose-response correlation indicated that gallstone risk was reduced by 4% (RR = 0.96, 95%CI, 0.93-0.98) and 3% (RR = 0.97, 95%CI, 0.96-0.98) for every 200 g per day increment in vegetables consumption (P = .001) and fruits consumption (P = .001), respectively.

Conclusion: This study suggests vegetables and fruits consumption is correlated with a significantly reduced risk of gallstone disease.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow diagram of study selection process.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Forest plot of vegetables consumption with the risk of gallstone disease. The size of gray box is positively proportional to the weight assigned to each study, and horizontal lines represent 95% confidence intervals.
Figure 3
Figure 3
The dose-response analysis between vegetables consumption and the risk of gallstone disease. The solid line and long dash line represent the estimated relative risk and its 95% confidence interval. Short dash line represents the linear relationship.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Forest plot of fruits consumption with the risk of gallstone disease. The size of gray box is positively proportional to the weight assigned to each study, and horizontal lines represent 95% confidence intervals.
Figure 5
Figure 5
The dose-response analysis between fruits consumption and the risk of gallstone disease. The solid line and long dash line represent the estimated relative risk and its 95% confidence interval. Short dash line represents the linear relationship.

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