A comparison of sodium fusidate ointment and mupirocin ointment in superficial skin sepsis

Curr Med Res Opin. 1988;11(2):142-8. doi: 10.1185/03007998809110457.

Abstract

Sodium fusidate ointment and mupirocin ointment were compared in 354 patients with superficial skin sepsis. The ointments were applied 3-times daily, or once daily when covered by a dressing, and the response assessed after 6 to 8 days. Both preparations proved effective clinically with 86% of patients responding. There was no difference between the two preparations in cases of primary infection (85% to both ointments), including a sub-group with impetigo (sodium fusidate 88% and mupirocin 84%), or secondary infection (sodium fusidate 81% and mupirocin 89%). Sodium fusidate ointment (98%) was significantly better (p less than 0.05) than mupirocin (82%) in patients with other superficial infections. Both ointments were equally effective in cases where Gram-positive, Gram-negative or mixed Gram-positive/Gram-negative bacteria were isolated. Adverse effects were reported in 1.0% of patients using sodium fusidate ointment and in 7.4% of patients using mupirocin ointment. The majority of complaints concerned the greasiness of mupirocin ointment.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use*
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Fatty Acids / administration & dosage
  • Fatty Acids / adverse effects
  • Fatty Acids / therapeutic use
  • Female
  • Fusidic Acid / administration & dosage
  • Fusidic Acid / adverse effects
  • Fusidic Acid / therapeutic use*
  • Humans
  • Impetigo / drug therapy
  • Infant
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Mupirocin
  • Ointments
  • Skin Diseases, Infectious / drug therapy*

Substances

  • Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • Fatty Acids
  • Ointments
  • Fusidic Acid
  • Mupirocin