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Review
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The Evolving Case Supporting Individualised Physiotherapy for Low Back Pain

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Review

The Evolving Case Supporting Individualised Physiotherapy for Low Back Pain

Jon Ford et al. J Clin Med.

Abstract

Low-back pain (LBP) is one of the most burdensome health problems in the world. Guidelines recommend simple treatments such as advice that may result in suboptimal outcomes, particularly when applied to people with complex biopsychosocial barriers to recovery. Individualised physiotherapy has the potential of being more effective for people with LBP; however, there is limited evidence supporting this approach. A series of studies supporting the mechanisms underpinning and effectiveness of the Specific Treatment of Problems of the Spine (STOPS) approach to individualised physiotherapy have been published. The clinical and research implications of these findings are presented and discussed. Treatment based on the STOPS approach should also be considered as an approach to individualised physiotherapy in people with LBP.

Keywords: individualisation; low-back pain; physiotherapy.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest LifeCare Health had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Conceptual phases of subgrouping research (adapted from Kent et al [19]).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Group mean scores (error bars indicate standard errors) for primary outcomes at baseline and 5-, 10-, 26- and 52-week follow-up in the STOPS Trial (adapted from Ford et al. [43], permission admitted).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Group mean scores (error bars indicate standard errors) for primary outcomes at baseline and 5-, 10-, 26- and 52-week follow-up in the STOPS Trial (adapted from Ford et al. [43], permission admitted).

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