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, 72 (2), 156-162

Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery and Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for the Treatment of Stones in Horseshoe Kidney; What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages Compared to Each Other?

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Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery and Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for the Treatment of Stones in Horseshoe Kidney; What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages Compared to Each Other?

Ibrahim Kartal et al. Cent European J Urol.

Abstract

Introduction: Kidney stones occur more frequently in patients with a horseshoe kidney (HSK) anomaly. Abnormal anatomy may make the stone removal procedures more difficult. Therefore we aimed to evaluate and compare retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for the treatment of renal stones in the HSK anomaly.

Material and methods: In this descriptive study, patients with HSK anomaly who underwent RIRS and PCNL procedures were retrospectively evaluated. Demographic and renal stone characteristics, success and complications associated with the surgical methods were compared across patients.

Results: A total of 49 patients were evaluated, 28 underwent RIRS and 21 underwent PCNL. No differences were determined between the groups concerning the demographics of patients and stone characteristics. A single session and final stone-free rate was 71.4% and 85.7% in RIRS, 81% and 90.5% in PCNL (both p ≥0.05). However, RIRS had more re-treatment rate, while its mean length of hospital stay was shorter than PCNL (p = 0.035, p = 0.001). While no differences were detected between the associated complication rates, more of the complications encountered in the PCNL group were of a serious nature.

Conclusions: In the HSK anomaly, renal stones can be treated with RIRS and PCNL procedures with high success. With its minimal morbidity, low complication rates and the minor character of the associated complications, the RIRS procedure can sometimes be preferred to avoid complications related to PCNL in HSK anomaly with big sized kidney stones.

Keywords: horseshoe kidney; morbidity; nephrolithotomy; percutaneous; renal stone; retrograde intrarenal surgery; success.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1A
Figure 1A
Preoperative axial CT, KUB, and postoperative KUB images of a patient who underwent RIRS for right kidney stone in HSK.
Figure 1B
Figure 1B
Preoperative axial CT, KUB, and postoperative KUB images of a patient who underwent PCNL for right kidney stones in HSK.

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