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Next-generation Sequencing of Whole Saliva From Patients With Primary Sjögren's Syndrome and non-Sjögren's Sicca Reveals Comparable Salivary Microbiota

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Next-generation Sequencing of Whole Saliva From Patients With Primary Sjögren's Syndrome and non-Sjögren's Sicca Reveals Comparable Salivary Microbiota

Maria Lynn Sembler-Møller et al. J Oral Microbiol.

Abstract

Objective: To characterize and compare the salivary microbiota in patients with pSS and patients with non-Sjögren's-related sicca, and to relate the findings to their oral health status and saliva flow rates. Methods: Twenty-four patients fulfilled the 2016 classification criteria for pSS and 34 did not (non-pSS). A clinical examination included registration of decayed, missing and filled teeth/-surfaces and collection of whole saliva. The microbiota was characterized using next-generation sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Data were annotated against the eHOMD database. Results: A total of 509 different bacterial taxa were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to the abundance of predominant genera, bacterial diversity and relative abundance on the genus or species level. The two groups did not differ with regard to general health, including intake of xerogenic medication and polypharmacy, oral health status or unstimulated and stimulated whole saliva flow rates. Conclusion: The salivary microbiota and oral health status, as well as salivary flow rate in patients with pSS resemble that of non-pSS patients. Our findings indicate that changes in the salivary microbiota do not appear to be determined by the disease entity pSS itself.

Keywords: 16S rRNA; Primary Sjögren’s syndrome; hyposalivation; microbiota; saliva.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Comparative analysis on group level based on data from HOMINGS. (a) Mean relative abundance of the 15 most predominant bacterial genera in each group. (b) Mean relative abundance of the bacterial species comprising >1% of the total microbiota from all 58 samples. (c) Principal component analysis, where axes are expressed as the two most decisive components accounting for a total of 41.7% of the variation in the dataset. (d) Correspondence analysis, where axes are expressed as the two most decisive inertias accounting for a cumulative inertia of 21.7%.

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Grant support

This study was funded by the Danish Dental Association Research Foundation, The Danish Foundation of Mutual Efforts in Dental Care, A.P. Møller Foundation for the Advancement of Medical Care, and The Danish Rheumatism Association.

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