Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 14 (8), 815-826

Neural Substrates for Anticipation and Consumption of Social and Monetary Incentives in Depression

Affiliations

Neural Substrates for Anticipation and Consumption of Social and Monetary Incentives in Depression

Zhenhong He et al. Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci.

Abstract

Depression has been reliably associated with abnormalities in the neural representation of reward and loss. However, most studies have focused on monetary incentives; fewer studies have considered neural representation of social incentives. A direct comparison of non-social and social incentives within the same study would establish whether responses to the different incentives are differentially affected in depression. The functional magnetic resonance imaging study presented here investigated the neural activity of individuals with subthreshold depression (SD) and healthy controls (HCs) while they participated in an incentive delay task offering two types of reward (monetary gain vs social approval) and loss (monetary loss vs social disapproval). Compared to HCs, individuals with SD showed increased subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) activity during anticipation of social loss, whereas the response in the putamen was decreased during consumption of social gain. Individuals with SD also exhibited diminished insula responses in consuming social loss. Furthermore, positive connectivity between the insula and ventral lateral pre-frontal cortex (VLPFC) was observed in individuals with SD while negative connectivity was found in HCs when consuming social loss. These results demonstrate neural alterations in individuals with depression, specific to the processing of social incentives, mainly characterised by dysfunction within the 'social pain network' (sgACC, insula and VLPFC).

Keywords: anticipation; depression; insula; social incentive; subgenual cingulate cortex; ventral lateral pre-frontal cortex.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Schematic of trial sequence for the Monetary (MID) and the Social Incentive Delay (SID) Task. To increase the ecological validity of the paradigm, static photos were replaced with short movie clips during the outcome period. The person in the picture gave his consent for the material to appear in academic journals.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Activation foci showing increased activity in individuals with subthreshold depression (SD) compared with healthy controls (HCs) during anticipation of social loss vs social control and the follow-up interaction effect between task and group in the left subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ROI analysis, P < 0.012, Bonferroni-adjusted FDR, displayed on the SPM canonical template). All conditions (monetary gain, monetary loss, social gain and social loss) have been contrasted by relevant control conditions.
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Activation foci showing decreased activity in individuals with SD compared with HCs during consumption of social gain vs social control and the follow-up interaction effect between task and group in the left putamen (ROI analysis, P < 0.012, Bonferroni-adjusted FDR). All conditions have been contrasted by relevant control conditions.
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Activation foci showing decreased activity in individuals with SD compared with HCs during consumption of social loss vs social control and the follow-up interaction effect between task and group in the left insula (ROI analysis, P < 0.012, Bonferroni-adjusted FDR). All conditions have been contrasted by relevant control conditions.
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Scatter plot of partial correlations between the sensitivity to punishment (assessed by SPSRQ) and the maximal peak activation (beta weights) at insula during consumption of social loss vs social control. The correlation was adjusted for depression severity measured by the SDS scale.
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Functional connectivity between insula and rVLPFC during the consumption of social loss vs social control. (A) Coronal view of insula (seed), defined by peak voxel that reached significance during second-level analyses. Then, a VOI was generated by creating a 6 mm sphere around this voxel. (B) Sagittal view of rVLPFC showing increased functional connectivity in individuals with SD. (C) The bar chart of the parameter estimates and SEM in the rVLPFC cluster.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Anand A., Li Y., Wang Y., Wu J., Gao S., Bukhari L., et al. (2005). Activity and connectivity of brain mood regulating circuit in depression: a functional magnetic resonance study. Biological Psychiatry, 57(10), 1079–88. - PubMed
    1. Beck A.T., Steer R.A., Brown G.K. (1996). Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition Manual, San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation.
    1. Berridge K.C. (1999). Pleasure, pain, desire, and dread: hidden core processes of emotion In: Kahneman D., Diener E., Schwarz N., editors. Well-being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology, New York: Russell Sage Foundation, pp. 525–57.
    1. Brinkmann K., Franzen J., Rossier C., Gendolla G.H.E. (2014). I don’t care about others’ approval: dysphoric individuals show reduced effort mobilization for obtaining a social reward. Motivation and Emotion, 38(6), 790–801.
    1. Caouette J.D., Guyer A.E. (2016). Cognitive distortions mediate depression and affective response to social acceptance and rejection. Journal of Affective Disorders, 190, 792–9. - PMC - PubMed

Publication types

Feedback