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, 29 (3), 8373
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Effects of a Vibrational Proprioceptive Stimulation on Recovery Phase After Maximal Incremental Cycle Test

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Effects of a Vibrational Proprioceptive Stimulation on Recovery Phase After Maximal Incremental Cycle Test

Francesco Coscia et al. Eur J Transl Myol.

Abstract

Global Proprioceptive Resonance (GPR) is a recently developed approach conceived to solicit the various cutaneous mechanoreceptors, through application of mechanical multifocal vibration at low amplitude and at definite body sites, limiting the stimulation of the profound structures. This interventional study evaluated the effects of GPR on cardiorespiratory function during the post-exertional recovery period. A group of volunteers involved in Triathlon (a multisport discipline consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines higly demanding in terms of metabolic engagment), underwent two maximal incremental exercise tests until exhaustion followed alternatively to (a) a 13 minutes section of GPR or (b) a standard low intensity exercise acute trend of the same duration. These effects of these two approaches were compared in terms of recovery of: heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and venous lactate concentration (Lac). The physiological parameters (HR, RR, SpO2 and Lac) recorded in the pre-exertion session showed similar values between the 40 volunteers while several differences were recorded in the post-exertion phase. After 6 min of GPR recovery it was recorded a drop in RR below baseline (19.4±4.15 min-1 vs. 12.2± 0.4 min-1; p<0.001) coupled with an increase in peripheral oxygen saturation above the baseline (GPR: 99.0%±0.16% vs. 96.6%±0.77%, p<0.001). Moreover, the most striking result was the drop in lactate concentration measured after 13 min of GPR recovery: 84.5±3.5% in GPR vs 2.9±7.6% reduction in standard recovery (p<0.001). Notably no differences were recorded recovery of heart rate. GPR has promising effects on post-exercise recovery on RR, SpO2 and lactate level on young athletes.

Keywords: global proprioceptive resonance; incremental test; recovery phase.

Conflict of interest statement

We confirm that we have read the Journal’s position on issues involved in ethical publication and affirm that this report is consistent with those guidelines.

Figures

Fig 1.
Fig 1.
Scheme depicting the entire study protocol GPR = global proprioceptive resonance, HR = heart rate, RR = respiratory rate, SpO2 peripheral O2 saturation, Lactate = lactate concentration.
Fig 2.
Fig 2.
The graph shows the heart rate recorded in all the sessions: before (pre) of the exhaustive exercise, at its maximal level (peak) and during the recovery at 2, 6 and 13 minutes (2 min rcvr, 6 min rcvr and 6 min rcvr). The empty bars represent control group while dotted ones the GPR group.
Fig 3.
Fig 3.
The graph shows the respiratory rate (RR) recorded in all the sessions: before (pre) of the exhaustive exercise, at its maximal level (peak) and during the recovery at 2, 6 and 13 minutes (2 min rcvr, 6 min rcvr and 6 min rcvr). At 6 min of recovery we observed a significant decrease of the RR in the GPR group with respect to control (p≤0.001). The empty bars represent control group while dotted ones the GPR group.
Fig 4.
Fig 4.
The graph shows the peripheral blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) recorded in all the sessions: before (pre) of the exhaustive exercise, at its maximal level (peak) and during the recovery at 2, 6 and 13 minutes (2 min rcvr, 6 min rcvr and 6 min rcvr). At 6 and 13 min of recovery we observed a significant decrease of the parameter in the GPR group with respect to control (p≤0.001 for both points). The empty bars represent control group while dotted ones the GPR group.
Fig 5.
Fig 5.
The graph shows the peripheral blood concentration of lactate recorded during the experimental protocol: before (pre) of the exhaustive exercise, at its maximal level (peak) and during the recovery. At 13 min of recovery we observed a significant decrease of the lactate concentration in the GPR group with respect to control (p≤0.001). The empty bars represent control group while dotted ones the GPR group.

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Grant support

Funding: The work has been completely charged to the research funds provided by FC and PVG
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