Sleep and neurocognitive decline in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Alzheimers Dement. 2020 Feb;16(2):305-315. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2019.08.191. Epub 2020 Jan 6.

Abstract

Introduction: To determine if sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration predict seven-year neurocognitive decline in US Hispanics/Latinos (N = 5247).

Methods: The exposures were baseline SDB, daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration. The outcomes were change in episodic learning and memory (B-SEVLT-Sum and SEVLT-Recall), language (word fluency [WF]), processing speed (Digit Symbol Substitution), and a cognitive impairment screener (Six-item Screener [SIS]).

Results: Mean age was 63 ± 8 years, with 55% of the population being female with 7.0% Central American, 24.5% Cuban, 9.3% Dominican, 35.9% Mexican, 14.4% Puerto Rican, and 5.1% South American background. Long sleep (>9 hours), but not short sleep (<6 hours), was associated with decline (standard deviation units) in episodic learning and memory (βSEVLT-Sum = -0.22 [se = 0.06]; P < .001; βSEVLT-Recall = -0.13 [se = 0.06]; P < .05), WF (Pwf = -0.20 [se 5 0.06]; P < .01), and SIS (βSIS = -0.16 [se = 0.06]; P < .01), but not processing speed, after adjusting for covariates. SDB, sleepiness, and insomnia were not associated with neurocognitive decline.

Conclusion: Long sleep duration predicted seven-year cognitive decline.

Keywords: Cohort studies; Hispanic/Latino; Neurocognitive decline; Risk factors in epidemiology; Sleep.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Aged
  • Central America
  • Cognitive Dysfunction / ethnology*
  • Female
  • Hispanic or Latino / statistics & numerical data*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Neuropsychological Tests / statistics & numerical data
  • Public Health*
  • Puerto Rico
  • Sleep Apnea Syndromes
  • Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
  • Sleep Wake Disorders*
  • South America
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Time Factors