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Post-Exercise Recovery Following 30-Day Supplementation of Trans-Resveratrol and Polyphenol-Enriched Extracts

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Post-Exercise Recovery Following 30-Day Supplementation of Trans-Resveratrol and Polyphenol-Enriched Extracts

Edward Jo et al. Sports (Basel).

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 30-day consumption of trans-resveratrol and polyphenol-enriched extracts on indices of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and performance following eccentric-loaded resistance exercise (ECRE).

Methods: Following 30 days of resveratrol-polyphenol (RES) (n = 10) or placebo control (CTL) (n = 12) supplementation, subjects performed a bout of ECRE to induce EIMD. EIMD biomarkers, perceived soreness, pain threshold and tolerance, range of motion, and performance were measured before and 24 and 48 h after ECRE.

Results: CTL subjects demonstrated increased soreness at 24 (p = 0.02) and 48 h (p = 0.03) post-ECRE, while RES subjects reported increased soreness at 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.0003). CTL subjects exhibited decreased pain threshold in the vastus lateralis at 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.03). CTL subjects also displayed decreased pain tolerance in the vastus intermedius at 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.03) and the vastus lateralis at 24 (p = 0.003) and 48 h (p = 0.003). RES participants showed no change in pain threshold or tolerance from baseline. CTL subjects showed a decrease in mean (p = 0.04) and peak power (p = 0.04) at 24 h post-ECRE, while RES participants demonstrated no changes from baseline. No between-group differences were observed for the changes in serum creatine kinase. Serum C-reactive protein increased similarly in both groups at 24 h post-ECRE (p < 0.002), remaining elevated in CTL subjects while RES participants demonstrated a decline from 24 to 48 h (p = 0.04). Serum interleukin 6 increased at 24 h post-ECRE in both groups (p < 0.003) followed by a decrease from 24 to 48 h, returning to baseline levels only for RES subjects.

Conclusion: Trans-resveratrol and polyphenol-enriched extract supplementation may support the attenuation of soreness and inflammation and improve performance recovery following ECRE without modulation of indirect biomarkers of EIMD.

Keywords: polyphenols; skeletal muscle; supplementation.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Schematic of the experimental timeline. ICF = informed consent form, EHHQ = Exercise Health History Questionnaire, DXA = dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1RM = one-repetition maximum, ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, EIMD = exercise-induced muscle damage.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Perceived muscle soreness at rest at baseline, 24- and 48-h post-ECRE. ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant increase from baseline (p = 0.0003); ^ Significant increase from baseline (p < 0.05).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Perceived muscle soreness under muscular tension at baseline, 24- and 48-h post- ECRE. ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant increase from baseline (p < 0.0005); ^ Significant increase from baseline (p = 0.01); # Significant increase than baseline (p = 0.007)
Figure 4
Figure 4
Change in lower-body flexibility at 24- and 48-h post-ECRE. ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Mean power as a percentage of baseline at 24- and 48-h post-ECRE. MP = mean power, ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant decrease from baseline (p = 0.04).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Peak power as a percentage of baseline at 24- and 48-h post-ECRE. PP = peak power, ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant decrease from baseline (p = 0.04).
Figure 7
Figure 7
Serum creatine kinase (CK) at baseline and 24- and 48-h post-ECRE (left), and area under the curve (AUC) (right). ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant increase from baseline (p < 0.005); ^ Significant decrease from 24 h post-ECRE (p < 0.007).
Figure 8
Figure 8
Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) at baseline and 24- and 48-h post-ECRE (left), and area under the curve (AUC) (right). ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant increase from baseline (p < 0.002); ^ Significant decrease from 24 h post-ECRE (p = 0.04).
Figure 9
Figure 9
Serum interleukin 6 (IL6) at baseline and 24- and 48-h post-ECRE (left), and area under the curve (AUC) (right). ECRE = eccentric resistance exercise, CTL = placebo, RES = resveratrol. * Significant increase from baseline (p < 0.003); ^ Significant decrease from 24 h post-ECRE (p < 0.0001).

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