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, 1-9
[Online ahead of print]

Relevance of Sleep, Pain Cognition, and Psychological Distress With Regard to Pain in Patients With Burning Mouth Syndrome

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Relevance of Sleep, Pain Cognition, and Psychological Distress With Regard to Pain in Patients With Burning Mouth Syndrome

Geun-Shin Lee et al. Cranio.

Abstract

Objective: To clarify the influence of sleep, psychological distress, and pain catastrophizing on the pain experience in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Methods: Ninety-three patients with BMS were investigated by reviewing medical records and questionnaires using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Symptom Checklist-90 revised (SCL-90R), and pain catastrophizing scale (PCS). Results: Of the 65 patients included in the study, 81.5% and 66% showed high PSQI and PCS scores, respectively. The PSQI, PCS, and SCL-90R scores correlated positively with pain interference. The result of multiple regression analysis demonstrated that helplessness and rumination of PCS significantly add to the prediction of pain interference. Discussion: Pain catastrophizing rather than psychological distress and sleep quality seems to be associated with pain experience in patients with BMS. Therefore, targeting pain catastrophizing, specifically rumination and helplessness, might lead to reduction of pain-related disability in BMS patients.

Keywords: Pain interference; burning mouth syndrome; pain catastrophizing; psychological distress; sleep quality.

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