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Fecal Microbiota and Metabolites Are Distinct in a Pilot Study of Pediatric Crohn's Disease Patients With Higher Levels of Perceived Stress

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Fecal Microbiota and Metabolites Are Distinct in a Pilot Study of Pediatric Crohn's Disease Patients With Higher Levels of Perceived Stress

Laura M Mackner et al. Psychoneuroendocrinology.

Abstract

Stress is associated with increased Crohn's Disease (CD) activity. This pilot study tested whether pediatric patients with CD reporting higher levels of perceived stress exhibited differences in the fecal microbiome and metabolome. The perceived stress scale (PSS) questionnaire was administered within 2 days of collecting a stool sample for microbiome (using 16S rRNA gene sequencing) and metabolome (using NMR metabolomics) analyses. Higher levels of perceived stress were correlated with increased disease activity on the short Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (sPCDAI). Patients with High PSS scores vs. Low PSS scores based on a median split had significantly lower relative abundances of Firmicutes and Anaerostipes, as well as higher relative abundances of Parabacteroides. Fecal alanine and nicotinate were also significantly different in patients with High vs. Low PSS Scores. This pilot study suggests that the fecal microbiome and metabolome differs in pediatric patients with CD and high perceived stress.

Keywords: Metabolome; Microbiome; Pediatric Crohn’s disease; Stress.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interests

The authors do not have any conflicts of interests that affect the conduct or interpretation of this study.

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