Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 64 (1)

Improved Antibiotic Prescribing Within a Veterans Affairs Primary Care System Through a Multifaceted Intervention Centered on Peer Comparison of Overall Antibiotic Prescribing Rates

Affiliations

Improved Antibiotic Prescribing Within a Veterans Affairs Primary Care System Through a Multifaceted Intervention Centered on Peer Comparison of Overall Antibiotic Prescribing Rates

Nathan R Shively et al. Antimicrob Agents Chemother.

Abstract

Reducing inappropriate outpatient antibiotic use is an important national goal. Limited data exist on targeted education and peer comparison of overall antibiotic prescribing rates as an antimicrobial stewardship strategy. Primary care professionals (PCPs) from all seven clinics within our health care system were offered an education session, followed by monthly e-mails with their antibiotic prescribing rate, peer prescribing rates, and a system target. A pre-post analysis was conducted to compare prescribing rates during the intervention period (January to June 2017) to a seasonal baseline (January to June 2016) using a regression model. A random sample of prescriptions was reviewed for adherence to consensus guidelines. Educational sessions were attended by 68.5% (50/73) of PCPs. From the baseline to the intervention period, the mean rate of monthly antibiotic prescriptions declined from 76.9 to 49.5 per 1,000 office visits (35.6% reduction [P < 0.001]). Among reviewed cases, unnecessary antibiotic prescribing declined (58.8% [80/136] versus 38.9% [70/180]; 33.9% reduction [P = 0.0006]), and the rate of optimally prescribed antibiotics increased (19.9% [27/136] versus 30% [54/180]; 50.8% increase [P = 0.05]). If an antibiotic was indicated, there were no significant differences in prescribing of guideline-discordant agents (21.4% [12/56] versus 19.1% [21/110] [P = 0.8]) or guideline-concordant agents for a guideline-discordant duration (38.6% [17/44] versus 39.3% [35/89] [P = 1]). There were significant reductions in azithromycin and fluoroquinolone prescriptions (50.9% and 59.4% [P values of <0.001], respectively), but most prescriptions for these agents in the intervention period remained inappropriate. Initial education followed by monthly peer comparison of overall antibiotic prescribing rates reduced total and unnecessary antibiotic prescribing in primary care clinics.

Keywords: antimicrobial stewardship; inappropriate prescribing; outpatient; peer comparison; primary care.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback