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Comment
. 2019 Nov 12;6(6):ENEURO.0393-19.2019.
doi: 10.1523/ENEURO.0393-19.2019. Print Nov/Dec 2019.

Does Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Inflammation Causes Sex Differences in Schizophrenia-Related Behavioral Outcomes in Adult Rats?

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Does Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Inflammation Causes Sex Differences in Schizophrenia-Related Behavioral Outcomes in Adult Rats?

Rosalind S E Carney. eNeuro. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Highlighted Research Paper: Maternal Immune Activation during Pregnancy Alters the Behavior Profile of Female Offspring of Sprague Dawley Rats, by Brittney R. Lins, Wendie N. Marks, Nadine K. Zabder, Quentin Greba, and John G. Howland.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Flowchart depicting the order of the battery of behavioral tests (Adapted from Figure 1 in Lins et al., 2019.).
Figure 2.
Figure 2.
Experimental setup and results of cross-modal recognition task. A, The Y maze assembled for the cross-modal phase, which has a tactile sample phase and visual test phase. B, Adult offspring prenatally exposed to polyI:C or saline failed to display cross-modal recognition memory as novel object exploration was equal to chance. Schematic has been published previously (Lins et al., 2018; Paylor et al., 2016) (Adapted from Figure 4 in Lins et al., 2019.).
Figure 3.
Figure 3.
Experimental setup and results of the oddity discrimination task. A, Schematic of the white square arena used to conduct the oddity discrimination task showing the arrangement of three identical objects and one different, or odd, object. The schematic has been published previously (Lins et al., 2018). B, Bar graph displaying the percentage of total object exploration spent examining the odd object. Prenatally polyI:C-exposed adult offspring displayed significantly less oddity preference than offspring exposed to saline prenatally (*p < 0.05). (Figure 5 from Lins et al., 2019.).

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