Side Plank Pose Exercises for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients

Glob Adv Health Med. 2019 Nov 4;8:2164956119887720. doi: 10.1177/2164956119887720. eCollection 2019.

Abstract

Background: Fishman et al. reported that side plank poses asymmetrically strengthened the convex side of the curve and decreased primary Cobb angle by 49% among compliant patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS).

Methods: AIS patients with curves of 10° to 45° were randomized into the front plank (control) or side plank group. The side plank was performed with their curve convex down. A weekly survey monitored compliance, defined by completing poses 4 or more times a week.

Results: A total of 64 patients were enrolled; 34% (22 of 64) of patients (mean age = 13 years) were compliant. In the control group, there were 11 compliant patients with 6 undergoing brace treatment. At enrollment, they had a mean Cobb angle of 30° (range: 14°-40°) and mean scoliometer reading of 13°. At 6 months, they had a mean Cobb angle of 30° (range: 14°-42°) and mean scoliometer of 12°. In the side plank group, there were 11 compliant patients with 5 undergoing brace treatment. At enrollment, they had a mean Cobb angle of 32° (range: 21°-44°) and mean scoliometer reading of 12°. At 6 months, they had a mean Cobb angle of 31° (range: 17°-48°) and a mean scoliometer reading of 13°. There were no significant changes in either the control or side plank group in regards to primary Cobb angle (control: P = .53, side plank: P = .67) or scoliometer (control: P = .22, side plank: P = .45).

Conclusion: There were no significant changes in primary Cobb angle or scoliometer after 6 months of side plank exercises. In contrast to a prior study, there was no improvement in curve magnitude in AIS patients performing side plank exercises.

Keywords: intervention; randomized trial; young adults.