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, 10 (23), 5727-5734
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Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes of Cancer During Pregnancy: A Multi-Center Observational Study

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Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes of Cancer During Pregnancy: A Multi-Center Observational Study

Zhang Yp et al. J Cancer.

Abstract

Cancer during pregnancy has increased because of the increased maternal age at the time of the first pregnancy and/or second child policy in China. The main purpose of the study is to report the existing data concerning the maternal and children's outcomes in pregnant women complicating cancer. In this multi-center, prospective cohort study, we compared women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy and their children with matched women without cancer diagnoses. The primary outcomes were maternal and children's mortalities, as well as the Ages and Stages Questionnaires-3(ASQ) of children. A total of 80,524 pregnant women were screened. Of whom 83(0.1%) were diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy. Death occurs in 42.2% (35/83) women during follow-up. During pregnancy, 24 women terminated pregnancy before 28 weeks and among this 8(33.3%) died. Ten women received chemotherapy and 49 did not receive chemotherapy. Compared with the matched controls, there were less incidences of premature rupture of membrane (5.1% vs 35.6%, P=0.000) and more caesarean rates (84.7% vs 52.5%, P=0.001) and with higher pregnancy order (2.7±1.7 vs 2.0±1.0, P=0.007) in pregnant women with cancer. These women also had increased mortality compared with control group (45.8% vs 1.7%, P=0.000). Women who received chemotherapy had a statistically significant lower mortality rate when compared to the non-chemotherapy group (1:9 vs 26:23, P=0.016). However, there were no differences found in mortality of children and ASQ assessment between two groups. Chemotherapy may result in reduced mortality of women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy, without affecting the mortality of children and ASQ-associated development.

Keywords: complicating cancer; pregnancy.

Conflict of interest statement

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interest exists.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
The flow diagram of study design and recruitment
Figure 2
Figure 2
The distribution of cancer in 83 pregnant women. the 5 main cancers was leukemia, thyroid carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, oophoroma and breast cancer.
Figure 3
Figure 3
The distribution of cancer in 35 dead women. the 5 main cancers was leukemia, thyroid carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, oophoroma and breast cancer.
Figure 4
Figure 4
The average maternal ages of the five main cancers.
Figure 5
Figure 5
The trends of maternal age of women with cancer. From 2012 to 2016, there were a decreased trends in the maternal age of women with cancer diagnosed. However, no significant differences were shown among years. (32.1±4.7 vs 30.7±6.0 vs 31.8±4.4 vs 29.2±6.1 vs 30.1±5.8, P=0.644)
Figure 6
Figure 6
The trends of morbidity rate of women with cancer. From 2012 to 2016, there were a increased trends in the morbidity rate of women with cancer, and they were 7/15404, 16/15712, 12/14890, 25/14550, 23/17900, respectively. Also, significant differences were found among the past five years. (0.05% vs 0.10% vs 0.08% vs 0.17% vs 0.13%, P=0.010).

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