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Optimization of Polysaccharide Production From Cordyceps militaris by Solid-State Fermentation on Rice and Its Antioxidant Activities

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Optimization of Polysaccharide Production From Cordyceps militaris by Solid-State Fermentation on Rice and Its Antioxidant Activities

Ling Xu et al. Foods.

Abstract

Polysaccharides are an important class of bioactive components of medical mushroom and herbs and are now used as natural drugs or dietary supplements on a global scale. In this paper, we aimed to increase the polysaccharide production of Cordyceps militaris and the antioxidant activities of fermented rice by solid-state fermentation. The media components and culture condition were optimized by orthogonal design and mono-factor tests using rice as the raw material. The optimal media consisted of (g/L): rice (50), fructose (7), glycerin (7), peptone (1), MgCl2 (0.11), VB1 (0.05), VB2 (0.05), CaCl2 (1.5), corn bran (6), and a water-materials ratio of 100%. The fermentation condition was as follows: inoculum volume of 5.5% (v/w), rice weight of 50 g in one bowl with a diameter of 120 mm and a depth of 90 mm, incubation temperature of 26 °C, and incubation time of seven days. Under the optimized condition, the maximal C. militaris polysaccharide content and free radical scavenging ratio were 68.3 mg/g dry substrate and 98.9%, respectively. This study provides a new strategy for the production of healthy food from traditional food.

Keywords: Cordyceps militaris; antioxidant activities; free radical; polysaccharide; solid-state fermentation.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Effect of inoculum volume on CPS production and antioxidant activities of substrate.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Effect of rice weight on CPS production and antioxidant activities of substrate.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Effect of incubation temperature on CPS production and antioxidant activities of substrate.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Effect of culture time on CPS production and antioxidant activities of substrate.

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