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, 48 (1), 39-47

Modified Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure: Suture-Button Fixation Achieves Excellent Remodeling at 3-Year Follow-up

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Modified Arthroscopic Latarjet Procedure: Suture-Button Fixation Achieves Excellent Remodeling at 3-Year Follow-up

Jian Xu et al. Am J Sports Med.

Abstract

Background: Some studies have advocated the use of suture-button fixation during the Latarjet procedure to reduce complications associated with screw fixation. However, the sample size of these studies is relatively small, and their follow-up period is short.

Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of the suture-button Latarjet procedure with at least 3 years of follow-up and remodeling of the coracoid graft.

Study design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: A total of 152 patients who underwent the suture-button Latarjet procedure between February 2013 and February 2016 were selected, and 128 patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. Preoperative and postoperative clinical results were assessed. The position and healing condition of the coracoid graft and arthropathy of the glenoid and humeral head were also assessed using radiography and 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT).

Results: The mean follow-up time was 40.3 ± 5.8 months. There were 102 patients included in this study. The mean visual analog scale score for pain during motion, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, the Rowe score, and the Walch-Duplay score were improved considerably. A total of 100 grafts achieved bone union. The overall absorption rate was 12.6% ± 4.3%. Graft absorption mostly occurred on the edge and outside the "best-fit" circle of the glenoid. A vertical position was achieved in 98 grafts (96% of all cases) immediately postoperatively, with the mean graft midline center at the 4 o'clock position. In the axial view, CT showed that 89 grafts were flush to the glenoid, whereas 2 and 11 grafts were fixed medially and laterally, respectively. In all cases, the bone graft and glenoid tended to extend toward each other to form concentric circles during the remodeling process. During follow-up observations, the height of the 11 grafts that were positioned laterally (ie, above the glenoid level) exhibited a wave-curved change. No arthropathy was observed in any patient.

Conclusion: Patient outcomes were satisfactory after the modified arthroscopic suture-button Latarjet technique. Graft absorption mostly occurred on the edge and outside the "best-fit" circle of the glenoid. The graft exhibited the phenomenon of ectatic growing when it fused with the glenoid and finally remodeled to a new concentric circle with the humeral head analogous to the original glenoid. Grafts positioned laterally did not cause arthropathy of the joints within the period of the study.

Keywords: Latarjet; anterior instability; glenoid defect; outcome; remodeling; shoulder; suture button.

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