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, 9 (1), 18042

Efficacy and Safety of Lavender Essential Oil (Silexan) Capsules Among Patients Suffering From Anxiety Disorders: A Network Meta-Analysis

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Efficacy and Safety of Lavender Essential Oil (Silexan) Capsules Among Patients Suffering From Anxiety Disorders: A Network Meta-Analysis

Wuan Shuen Yap et al. Sci Rep.

Abstract

A systematic review and network-meta analysis (NMA) were performed to estimate significance of the anxiolytic effect of lavender essential oil taken as silexan capsules versus other comparators (i.e., placebo/paroxetine/lorazepam). The outcome of interest was Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA). Weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated to estimate the treatment effect at the confidence interval of 95%. League tables were generated using treatment effect, for all pairwise comparisons, where WMD < 0 favors the column-defining treatment. Five studies were identified with a total of 524 participants receiving treatment with silexan 80 mg and 121 participants taking silexan 160 mg. The NMA results indicated that consumption of silexan 160 mg resulted in higher decline of HAMA score [WMD -1.14 (-1.10, 3.39)] in comparison to silexan 80 mg, placebo [-2.20 (-4.64, 0.24)] and paroxetine [-1.24 (-5.34, 2.85)]. The effect of silexan 80 mg was observed to be same as that of paroxetine. Overall, silexan 160 mg was noticed to be a more efficient treatment giving significant decline in HAMA score across other comparators. However, no improvements in HAMA score was observed for the group receiving lorazepam 0.5 mg when compared to silexan 160 mg, silexan 80 mg, paroxetine 20 mg, and placebo.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no competing interests.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
PRISMA flow diagram.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Summary of risk of bias.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Risk of bias among studies.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Network Plot.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Pairwise comparison of all treatments.

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