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Co-Morbidity of DSM-IV Personality Disorder in Major Depressive Disorder Among Psychiatric Outpatients in China: A Further Analysis of an Epidemiologic Survey in a Clinical Population

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Co-Morbidity of DSM-IV Personality Disorder in Major Depressive Disorder Among Psychiatric Outpatients in China: A Further Analysis of an Epidemiologic Survey in a Clinical Population

Yuchen Zheng et al. Front Psychiatry.

Abstract

Introduction: It is common that personality disorder (PD) co-occurs with major depressive disorder (MDD). In the current literature, there is a dearth of information on the co-occurrence of PD and MDD among Chinese population. Materials and Methods: 609 individuals were randomly sampled from outpatients diagnosed as MDD in Shanghai Mental Health Center. Co-morbidity of PDs was assessed using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire Fourth Edition Plus (PDQ-4+) and eligible subjects were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II (SCID-II). The score of PDQ-4+ and the rate of SCID-II PD between subjects diagnosed with MDD and those with anxiety disorders (AD) were compared. Results: Two hundred fifty-eight outpatients (42.36%) with MDD were recognized to possess at least one criterion of diagnosis for PD, according to the DSM-IV. The most prevalent PD was depressive PD (14.61%), followed by avoidant (11.49%) and borderline (11.49%) PD. Cluster C PDs (anxious and panic PD) were the most common PD types (12.12%) when compared to other clusters. Compared to patients with AD, individuals with MDD were significantly more likely to have paranoid PD (6.6% vs. 3.3%, p = 0.011), borderline PD (11.5% vs. 3.7%, p = 0.000), passive-aggressive PD (5.6% vs. 2.4%, p = 0.007), and depressive PD (14.6% vs. 7.8%, p = 0.000). Discussion: The finding indicates that there is a high prevalence of PD among patients with MDD. More significant co-morbidity rates of PDs in MDD have been found when compared with AD. Further studies for the longitudinal impact of the PD-MDD co-morbidity are in need.

Keywords: China; anxiety disorders; co-morbidity; major depressive disorder; personality disorder.

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