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, 14 (12), e0226110
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Tobacco and E-cigarette Use Among Cancer Survivors in the United States

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Tobacco and E-cigarette Use Among Cancer Survivors in the United States

Ramzi G Salloum et al. PLoS One.

Abstract

Background: Limited information exist on tobacco and e-cigarette use patterns in cancer survivors. The purpose of this study is to report on use patterns in cancer survivors compared with non-cancer participants from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study.

Methods: Sociodemographic data and tobacco product use were analyzed for 32,244 adult participants from the PATH Study in 2013-2014 by cancer status and age. Logistic regression examined the patterns of and factors associated with tobacco use by cancer status.

Results: Overall, cancer survivors represented 7.1% (n = 1,527) of participants, were older, and had a higher proportion of females and non-Hispanic whites than non-cancer participants. In cancer survivors, current and former cigarette smoking was reported in 12.7% and 32.9% respectively, compared with 18.5% and 19.0% in non-cancer adults. Current e-cigarette use was reported by 3.8% of survivors compared with 5.7% of non-cancer participants. Dual tobacco use was reported by 25.0% and poly use by 6.9% of cancer survivors who currently smoked. All other forms of current tobacco use were individually reported by <5% of survivors. Young adult cancer survivors (aged 18-44) reported the highest rates of current cigarette smoking (27.9%) and current e-cigarette use (11.8%). The effects of age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, and income on tobacco use status were comparable for cancer survivors and non-cancer participants. Cancer survivors who were younger, male, of lower educational attainment, and those diagnosed with a tobacco-related cancer were more likely to report current tobacco use.

Conclusions: Among cancer survivors, cigarette smoking remains the predominant form of tobacco use, although other tobacco/nicotine use and dual/poly use are common. The PATH Study provides detailed tobacco product use patterns in survivors, including their adoption of emerging alternative tobacco products.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Figures

Fig 1
Fig 1. Mono, dual and poly tobacco/nicotine use among current users of any tobacco/nicotine products, by cancer status.
Note: 44 cancer survivors and 766 adults with no history of cancer were excluded due to missing values for any tobacco or nicotine product use.
Fig 2
Fig 2. Tobacco/Nicotine product use among current users of any tobacco/nicotine products, by cancer status.
Note: 44 cancer survivors and 766 adults with no history of cancer were excluded due to missing values for any tobacco or nicotine product use.

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Grant support

The authors received no specific funding for this work.
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