Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 24 (2), 153-164

Health Advantages and Disparities in Preterm Birth Among Immigrants Despite Disparate Sociodemographic, Behavioral, and Maternal Risk Factors in San Diego, California

Affiliations

Health Advantages and Disparities in Preterm Birth Among Immigrants Despite Disparate Sociodemographic, Behavioral, and Maternal Risk Factors in San Diego, California

Maria Rosario G Araneta et al. Matern Child Health J.

Abstract

Introduction: Reproductive health advantages have been reported among selected immigrants, but few studies have included new immigrants and refugees, nor simultaneously adjusted for socioeconomic, behavioral, and medical disparities.

Methods: We examined the risk of preterm birth (PTB, < 37 weeks' gestation) among singleton live births in San Diego County from 2007 to 2012. Multivariable regression was used to compare PTB (1) by nativity within racial/ethnic groups and (2) among immigrants compared to United States (US) born Whites, while adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioral, reproductive and medical variables.

Results: Among 230,878 singleton live births, overall PTB prevalence was highest among parturient women who were US-born Blacks (10.9%), Philippine (10.8%) and US-born Filipinas (10.7%), and US-born Asians (8.6%) despite differences in socioeconomic and maternal risk factors, and lowest among Somali (5.5%) migrants. Blacks born in Somalia or outside of the US, had significantly lower overall PTB prevalence compared to US-born Blacks (5.5% vs 7.6% vs 10.9%). Compared to US-born Whites, spontaneous PTB risk was significantly lower among Somali migrants (4.8% vs 3.7%, adjusted relative risk, aRR 0.7 [95% Confidence Intervals 0.5-0.9]), but higher among Philippine migrants (4.8% vs 7.7%, aRR 1.4 [1.3-1.6]). The strongest risk factor for overall PTB among nulliparous US-born Blacks was preexisting diabetes (aRR 3.81 [2.05-7.08]), and preexisting hypertension among Filipinas (aRR: 3.27 [2.36-4.54] and US-born Asians (aRR: 3.64 [1.61-8.24]).

Conclusion: Black migrants had lower PTB prevalence compared to US-born Blacks, but this immigrant advantage was not observed in other racial/ethnic groups. Compared to US-born Whites, Somali migrants had significantly lower risk of spontaneous PTB while Filipinas had elevated risk.

Keywords: Asian; Black; Filipino; Immigrants; Nativity; Preterm; Race/ethnicity; Somali.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Dec;211(6):675.e1-19 - PubMed

References

    1. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Sep;209(3):258.e1-8 - PubMed

References

    1. Am J Public Health. 1996 Jun;86(6):837-43 - PubMed

References

    1. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2016 Apr 26;16:86 - PubMed

References

    1. Matern Child Health J. 2014 Jan;18(1):90-100 - PubMed

References

    1. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2015 Jan;69(1):35-40 - PubMed

References

    1. Matern Child Health J. 2016 Feb;20(2):484-93 - PubMed

References

    1. BJOG. 2008 Dec;115(13):1630-40 - PubMed

References

    1. Reprod Health. 2013;10 Suppl 1:S1 - PubMed

References

    1. Obstet Gynecol. 2018 Feb;131(2):281-289 - PubMed

References

    1. BMJ Open. 2017 Jul 18;7(7):e015386 - PubMed

References

    1. Pediatrics. 2014 May;133(5):844-53 - PubMed

References

    1. Lancet. 2012 Jun 9;379(9832):2162-72 - PubMed

References

    1. Womens Health Issues. 2012 Sep;22(5):e501-7 - PubMed

References

    1. Diabetes Care. 2012 Jul;35(7):1492-8 - PubMed

References

    1. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014 Jul 21;14:239 - PubMed

References

    1. Matern Child Health J. 2014 Dec;18(10):2371-81 - PubMed

References

    1. Acta Paediatr. 2017 Sep;106(9):1409-1437 - PubMed

References

    1. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015 Aug 21;15:184 - PubMed

References

    1. Matern Child Health J. 2016 Sep;20(9):1849-60 - PubMed

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback