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Impact of a Social Media Campaign on Reach, Uptake, and Engagement With a Free Web- And App-Based Physical Activity Intervention: The 10,000 Steps Australia Program

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Impact of a Social Media Campaign on Reach, Uptake, and Engagement With a Free Web- And App-Based Physical Activity Intervention: The 10,000 Steps Australia Program

Anna T Rayward et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health.

Abstract

Social media campaigns provide broad-reach and convenience for promoting freely-available health programs. However, their effectiveness and subsequent engagement of new users is unknown. This study aimed to assess the reach and new member registration rates resulting from a dedicated 10,000 Steps social media campaign (SMC) and to compare program engagement and time to non-usage attrition of new users from the SMC with other users. SMC reach (using Facebook, Instagram, and display advertisements engagement metrics), new-user numbers, engagement (usage of the website and its features), and time to non-usage attrition were assessed using generalized linear regression, binary logistic regression, and Cox proportion hazards regression models. During the SMC, Instagram and display advertisement impressions, Facebook reach and new daily registrations were significantly higher compared with six weeks and one year prior. There were no between-group differences in the average usage of most website/program features. Risk of non-usage attrition was higher among new users from the SMC than new users from one year prior. The SMC was effective in promoting awareness of the 10,000 Steps program. Further research to identify long-term engagement strategies and the most effective combination of social media platforms for promotion of, and recruitment to, health programs is warranted.

Keywords: e-Health; physical activity intervention; recruitment; social media.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflicts of interest. The funders had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, or in the decision to publish the results.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
(a) Facebook advertisement examples; (b) Instagram advertisement example; (c) mobile display advertisement examples.
Figure 2
Figure 2
(a) Kaplan–Meier estimates of the survival distribution for time to non-usage attrition by group; (b) Cox proportional hazards regression curve of the survival distribution for time to non-usage attrition by group based on the model adjusted for Challenges and Tournaments (Table 7; HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.28).

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