Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 5 (11), e02942
eCollection

EEG Cross-Frequency Correlations as a Marker of Predisposition to Affective Disorders

Affiliations

EEG Cross-Frequency Correlations as a Marker of Predisposition to Affective Disorders

Gennady G Knyazev et al. Heliyon.

Abstract

EEG cross-frequency amplitude-amplitude correlation (CF-AAC) has been considered as a potential marker of social anxiety and other affective disturbances. Functional significance of this phenomenon remains unclear, partly because the majority of studies used channel-level analysis, which precluded the spatial localization of observed effects. It is not also clear whether CF-AAC may serve as a marker of specific pathological conditions and specific states, or a more general predisposition to affective disturbances. We used source-level analysis of EEG data obtained in resting conditions in a nonclinical sample and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and investigated associations of CF-AAC measures with a broad range of known risk factors for affective disorders, including age, gender, genotype, stress exposure, personality, and self-reported 'neurotic' symptomatology. A consistent pattern of associations showed that all investigated risk factors were associated with an enhancement of CF-AAC in cortical regions associated with emotional and self-referential processing. It could be concluded that CF-AAC is a promising candidate marker of a general predisposition to affective disorders at preclinical stages.

Keywords: 5-HTTLPR; Biological psychiatry; Cross-frequency correlations; Depression; EEG; Emotion; Individual differences; Major depressive disorder; Mental disorder; Neuroscience; Personality; Physiology; Source-level analysis; Stress.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Effect of 5-HTTLPR on DA-AAC (S/S > L/S > L/L) on DA-AAC (n = 115). Warm tints show clusters where DA-AAC measures are higher in S allele carriers.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Regression of stress (SRRS scores) on DA-AAC (A) and DB-AAC (B) maps (n = 115). Warm tints show clusters where sfCF-AAC measures correlate positively with SRRS scores.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Effect of personality on DA-AAC (n = 115). A – effect of neuroticism; B – effect of extraversion. Warm tints show clusters where sfCF-AAC measures correlate positively and cool tints show clusters where they correlate negatively with respective personality scales.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Regression of SRQ scores on sfCF-AAC maps (n = 115). Warm tints show clusters where sfCF-AAC measures correlate positively with SRQ scores.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Results of independent samples T-tests comparing sfCF-AAC measures in MDD patients and controls. A - DA-AAC (patients > controls); B - DA-AAC (patients < controls); C - DB-AAC (patients < controls). Warm tints show clusters where sfCF-AAC measures are higher in patients and cool tints show clusters where they are higher in controls.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Aftanas L.I., Reva N.V., Varlamov A.A., Pavlov S.V., Makhnev V.P. Analysis of evoked EEG synchronization and desynchronization in conditions of emotional activation in humans: temporal and topographic characteristics. Neurosci. Behav. Physiol. 2004;34:859–867. - PubMed
    1. Aftanas L.I., Varlamov A.A., Pavlov S.V., Makhnev V.P., Reva N.V. Affective picture processing: event-related synchronization within individually defined human theta band is modulated by valence dimension. Neurosci. Lett. 2001;303:115–118. - PubMed
    1. Ahlfors S.P., Han J., Belliveau J.W., Hämäläinen M.S. Sensitivity of MEG and EEG to source orientation. Brain Topogr. 2010;23:227–232. - PMC - PubMed
    1. Anderson I.M., Shippen C., Juhasz G., Chase D., Thomas E., Downey D. State-dependent alteration in face emotion recognition in depression. Br. J. Psychiatry. 2011;198:302–308. - PubMed
    1. Ashburner J., Barnes G., Chen C.C., Daunizeau J., Flandin G., Friston K. Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging; London: 2014. SPM12 Manual.https://www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm/doc/spm12_manual.pdf

LinkOut - more resources

Feedback