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, 2019, 9848125
eCollection

The Effect of Hypertension Duration and the Age of Onset on CV Risk Factors Expression in Perimenopausal Women

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The Effect of Hypertension Duration and the Age of Onset on CV Risk Factors Expression in Perimenopausal Women

Ljiljana Trtica Majnarić et al. Int J Hypertens.

Abstract

Background: The impact of hypertension duration and the time of onset on the expression of metabolic syndrome (MS) and other CV risk factors, in perimenopausal women, have not been studied so far. Methods. A total of 202 women, old 47-59 years, and diagnosed with hypertension, were recruited from primary care practices in eastern Croatia. The categories of hypertension duration were defined as <5, 5-10, and >10 years. Data were analyzed by standard statistical procedures.

Results: The proportion of women with MS increases in parallel with hypertension duration (p = 0.025). Among the examined CV risk factors, significant increase in parallel with hypertension duration was found for body mass index (p = 0.007) and triglycerides (p = 0.07). The highest proportion of women with diabetes duration of less than 5 years, indicating recent diabetes onset, was found in the category of hypertension duration of less than 5 years, corresponding with the onset of hypertension in the time around menopause (p = 0.003). The strongest linear correlations with BMI and waist circumference were found for total serum cholesterol (r = 0.355 and 0.499, respectively).

Conclusion: Hypertension onset at the time around menopause appears together with abdominal obesity and may be a driving force for CV risk factor accumulation in postmenopausal women.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Proportions of women with and without metabolic syndrome according to categories of hypertension duration (<5 years, N = 31; 5–10 years, N = 116; >10 years, N = 55). It indicates that the proportion of women with metabolic syndrome, compared to those without, increases in parallel with increased hypertension duration. The differences are statistically significant (p=0.025).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Categories of diabetes duration (<5, 5–10, >10 years) according to categories of hypertension duration (<5, 5–10, >10 years); patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2, N = 55. It indicates the relative frequencies (%) of categories of diabetes duration (<5, 5–10, >10 years) distributed across categories of hypertension duration (<5, 5–10, >10 years). The highest frequency (100%) was found for the category of diabetes duration of less than 5 years, indicating recent diabetes onset, in the category of hypertension duration of less than 5 years, compared to longer hypertension duration (Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA, p=0.003).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Linear correlation between BMI and total serum cholesterol in hypertensive menopausal women.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Linear correlation between waist circumference and total serum cholesterol in hypertensive menopausal women.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Relative frequencies of components of metabolic syndrome and other CV risk factors in hypertensive menopausal women according to categories of hypertension duration (<5, 5–10, >10 years). It shows the relative frequencies of particular components of MS and other CV risk factors among hypertensive menopausal women according to categories of hypertension duration (<5, 5–10, >10 years), presented graphically, as bar diagrams.

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