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Reliability of a Virtual Prosthodontic Project Realized Through a 2D and 3D Photographic Acquisition: An Experimental Study on the Accuracy of Different Digital Systems

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Reliability of a Virtual Prosthodontic Project Realized Through a 2D and 3D Photographic Acquisition: An Experimental Study on the Accuracy of Different Digital Systems

Luca Lavorgna et al. Int J Environ Res Public Health.

Abstract

Aims: The study aims to assess the accuracy of digital planning in dentistry, evaluating the characteristics of different intraoral 3D scanners and comparing it with traditional imaging 2D recording methods. Specifically, using computer aided design (CAD) software and measuring inside CAD software, authors want to verify the reliability of different models obtained with different techniques and machines.

Methods: 12 patients that needed aesthetic restorative treatment were enrolled in the study. All the patients underwent recording data of the height and width dental elements 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 size using different technologies and comparing 2D with 3D methods. A T test was then applied in order to verify whether there was a statistically significant difference between the measurements obtained, comparing the different tools data (Emerald, TRIOS, Photogrammetry and DSS (Digital Smile System)) with the reference values.

Results: No significant differences emerged in the measurements made with the different scanners (Trios 3Shape ®, Planmeca Emerald ®) and photogrammetry. Therefore, what should be underlined regarding the 2D measurements is the speed and simplicity compared to all 3D techniques, so this work can help to better define the field of application and the limits connected to 2D techniques, giving a good window of the technique.

Conclusions: The low number of patients is not sufficient to provide statistically significant results, but the digital planning future prospects seem to be promising. This study results highlighted how a photogrammetric scanner for dental arches would only have a much smaller shooting field size and greater accuracy. Despite these considerations, the photogrammetric facial scanner provided excellent results for the measurement of individual teeth, showing a great versatility of use.

Keywords: dentistry; digital planning; digital workflow; intraoral scanner; prosthodontic; virtual.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Figures

Figure A1
Figure A1
Stone model scan evaluated distance. The sample has been chosen because of its reproducibility and low humidity, and the scan has been used as reference parameters.
Figure A2
Figure A2
Planmeca Emerald® Scan, distance measure were obtained and compared to stone model.
Figure A3
Figure A3
Trios 3Shape scan, measurements of obtained stl file with this scanner were compared to the stone model.
Figure A4
Figure A4
Photogrammetric exam, the device used for the photogrammetry of the face is the Face Shape Maxi 6 (Polishape 3D, Bari, Italy), in the Maxi Line version composed of six Canon D2000 reflex cameras equipped with Canon 50 mm f/1.8 STM lenses.
Figure A5
Figure A5
Digital Smile System Exam. Conducted with a Canon 5d mark III full frame reflex equipped with Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM optics and supported by a tripod (Manfrotto, Vicenza, Italy) placed at a distance of 1.50 m from the face of the patients.
Figure 1
Figure 1
A T-test was then used for comparing the averages calculated by pairs. Differences in the distribution of height values between the different acquisition methods, each of which corresponds to a distinct sample group, with respect to the reference volumes corresponding to zero on the ordinate axis. Groups on x axis and height differences are on the y axis.
Figure 2
Figure 2
A T-test was then used for comparing the averages calculated by pairs. Differences in the distribution of mesio-distal width values between the different acquisition methods, each corresponding to a distinct sample group, with respect to the reference volumes corresponding to zero on the ordinate axis. Groups on x axis and width differences are on the y axis.

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