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, 33 (1), 66-72

Effectiveness of Intradiscal Injection of Radiopaque Gelified Ethanol (DiscoGel ®) versus Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression in Patients With Chronic Radicular Low Back Pain

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Effectiveness of Intradiscal Injection of Radiopaque Gelified Ethanol (DiscoGel ®) versus Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression in Patients With Chronic Radicular Low Back Pain

Masoud Hashemi et al. Korean J Pain.

Abstract

Background: Low back pain secondary to discopathy is a common pain disorder. Multiple minimally invasive therapeutic modalities have been proposed; however, to date no study has compared percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) with intradiscal injection of radiopaque gelified ethanol (DiscoGel®). We are introducing the first study on patient-reported outcomes of DiscoGel® vs. PLDD for radiculopathy.

Methods: Seventy-two patients were randomly selected from either a previous strategy of PLDD or DiscoGel®, which had been performed in our center during 2016-2017. Participants were asked about their numeric rating scale (NRS) scores, Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores, and progression to secondary treatment.

Results: The mean NRS scores in the total cohort before intervention was 8.0, and was reduced to 4.3 in the DiscoGel® group and 4.2 in the PLDD group after 12 months, which was statistically significant. The mean ODI score before intervention was 81.25% which was reduced to 41.14% in the DiscoGel® group and 52.86% in the PLDD group after 12 months, which was statistically significant. Between-group comparison of NRS scores after two follow-ups were not statistically different (P = 0.62) but the ODI score in DiscoGel® was statistically lower (P = 0.001). Six cases (16.67%) from each group reported undergoing surgery after the follow-up period which was not statistically different.

Conclusions: Both techniques were equivalent in pain reduction but DiscoGel® had a greater effect on decreasing disability after 12 months, although the rate of progression to secondary treatments and/or surgery was almost equal in the two groups.

Keywords: Chronic Pain; Disability Evaluation; Discectomy; Intervertebral Disc; Low Back Pain; Pain Management; Radiculopathy; Visual Analog Scale.

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICT OF INTESTEST

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Comparison of numeric rating scale (NRS) scores between two groups in different time points (P = 0.62). PLDD: percutaneous laser disc decompression, DiscoGel®: radiopaque gelified ethanol.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Comparison of Oswestry disability index (ODI) between two groups in different time points (P = 0.001). PLDD: percutaneous laser disc decompression, DiscoGel®: radiopaque gelified ethanol.

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