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Changing Patterns in E-cigarette Use Among Minnesota Adults Between 2014 and 2018

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Changing Patterns in E-cigarette Use Among Minnesota Adults Between 2014 and 2018

Ann W St Claire et al. Prev Med Rep.

Abstract

Minnesota has observed declining combustible tobacco use and a large increase in e-cigarette use among youth and young adults. Less is known about adult e-cigarette users' frequency of use, smoking status, use of flavors, and demographic differences. The Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey (MATS) is a cross-sectional, random digit-dial telephone survey representative of Minnesotans aged 18 and over. MATS measured e-cigarette use in 2014 (N = 9304) and 2018 (N = 6065). In 2018, 6.0% of adult Minnesotans used an e-cigarette in the past 30 days; this was unchanged from 2014 (5.9%). While past 30-day e-cigarette use declined for current smokers (2014: 27.3%; 2018: 16.1% p < 0.001), it increased for never smokers (2014: 1.2%; 2018: 4.4% p < 0.001) and 18-24-year-olds (2014: 12.8%; 2018: 21.9% p = 0.001). Daily e-cigarette use increased from 2014 to 2018 for current smokers (p = 0.001), 25-44-year-olds (p < 0.001), females (p = 0.001), and those with a high-school education (p = 0.006). Among e-cigarette users in 2018, use of flavored e-cigarettes was associated with smoking status (p = 0.041), age (p < 0.001), and using e-cigarettes to quit smoking (p = 0.011). E-cigarettes appeal primarily to younger adults. Of concern are increases in never smokers initiating e-cigarette use, increasing their exposure to nicotine, addiction, and the risk of future combustible tobacco use. Simultaneously, fewer smokers are using e-cigarettes but those who do are using them more frequently. Use of flavored e-cigarettes was common and correlated with interest in quitting combustible cigarettes. These findings can inform recent calls for additional tobacco control policy and programs aimed at reducing e-cigarette use.

Keywords: Adults; E-cigarette; Flavors; Prevalence; Tobacco; Trends.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Changes in the frequency of e-cigarette use among past 30-day e-cigarette users, 2014–2018.

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