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, 5 (4), 308-316

Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A in Liver Tissues of Infants With Biliary Atresia

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Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A in Liver Tissues of Infants With Biliary Atresia

Alif Allam et al. Clin Exp Hepatol.

Abstract

Aim of the study: Assessment of hepatic expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in liver tissues of infants with biliary atresia (BA).

Material and methods: This retrospective study included 35 infants with BA (BA group), and 38 infants with cholestasis due to causes other than BA (non-BA group). All patients had undergone full history taking, through clinical examination, routine investigations and immunostaining of liver tissue for VEGF-A and cytokeratin 7 (CK7). The diagnosis of BA was confirmed by intraoperative cholangiography. In the non-BA group, other specific laboratory tests according to the expected etiology were done.

Results: Most of the BA group showed positive VEGF-A expression with variable degrees in both bile ducts (BDs; 80%), and arterial walls (AWs; 77.2%), while most of the non-BA group showed negative staining of VEGF in both BDs and AWs (89.5% and 86.8% respectively) (p < 0.0001). Positive VEGF expression in the portal structures in both BDs and AWs had 84.9% and 82.19% accuracy; respectively. The majority of BA group showed either grade II of positive cytokeratin-7 expression in liver tissues (45.7%) or grade III (34.3%), while most of the non-BA group showed grade I (71.1%) (p < 0.0001). Positive CK7 expression in > 25% of the liver tissues had 80.8% accuracy in discriminating between BA and non-BA.

Conclusions: VEGF-A expression in the portal structures in liver tissues in both BDs and AWs had very good accuracy in discriminating between BA and non-BA patients.

Keywords: biliary atresia; cytokeratin; growth factor.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors report no conflict of interest.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
A) These figures show positive VEGF in a case of a female infant 61 days old with type-III BA. There was brown positivity of VEGF in hepatocytes (black arrows), and in bile duct wall with stronger intensity (green arrows), magnification 100×. B) Negative staining of VEGF in 50-day-old male infant with successful post-Kasai in liver tissues. C) Positive VEGF in a case of a male infant 180 days old with CHF in liver tissues. There was very light brown color of positive VEGF expression in periductal (green arrows) compared to dark brown staining in hepatic parenchyma (black arrows), magnification 10×. D) Positive VEGF expression in 3-month-old male infant with PFIC-III in liver tissues. There was brown color in hepatocytes (black arrow), peri-ductal (green arrows) and periarterial blood vessel (red arrow), magnification 100×

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