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, 4 (27), 22292-22301
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Reinforcement of Polycaprolactone/Chitosan With Nanoclay and Controlled Release of Curcumin for Wound Dressing

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Reinforcement of Polycaprolactone/Chitosan With Nanoclay and Controlled Release of Curcumin for Wound Dressing

Yanping Huang et al. ACS Omega.

Abstract

A novel clay-reinforced polycaprolactone/chitosan/curcumin (PCl/CS/Clay/Cur) composite film was fabricated in this study. The prepared Cur-loading composite films were characterized with attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, water contact angle, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction, and the results showed good dispersion of clay in the composite films. The addition of nanoclay was found to significantly increase the tensile strength. Also, the clay-enhanced drug-loading films exhibited better controlled-release profiles of Cur than those membranes without clay. Skin disinfection test demonstrated that the curcumin-loaded film could protect wound from bacterial infection. Cytotoxicity analysis proved the good biocompatibility of the composite films. The clay-enhanced Cur-loading films might be promising candidates for wound care.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no competing financial interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Color of the Cur-loading solution. Numbers 1–6 represent PCl/Cur, PCl/CS/Cur, PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-1, PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-2, PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-3, and PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-4, respectively.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Surface morphology images of (a) PCl/Cur, (b) PCl/CS/Cur, (c) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-1, (d) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-2, (e) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-3, and (f) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-4. Magnification: 2000×.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Cross-section images of (a) PCl/Cur, (b) PCl/CS/Cur, (c) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-1, (d) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-2, (e) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-3, and (f) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-4. Magnification: 2000× and 5000×.
Figure 4
Figure 4
AFM images of (a) PCl/Cur, (b) PCl/CS/Cur, (c) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-1, (d) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-2, (e) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-3, and (f) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-4.
Figure 5
Figure 5
(a) DTG and (b) TG curves of the Cur-loading films.
Figure 6
Figure 6
DSC curves of the prepared Cur-loading membranes.
Figure 7
Figure 7
ATR-FTIR curves of (a) PCl, CS, and clay and (b) prepared Cur-loading films.
Figure 8
Figure 8
WCA analysis of curcumin-loaded films.
Figure 9
Figure 9
XRD diagram of prepared Cur-loading membranes.
Figure 10
Figure 10
Mechanical properties of prepared Cur-loading membranes. (a) Digital photo of PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-3. (b) Effect of clay contents on the tensile strength of the Cur-loading membranes. (c) Typical tensile stress–strain curves of the Cur-loading membranes.
Figure 11
Figure 11
Release profiles ((a) within 12 h and (b) within 168 h) of Cur from the prepared membranes.
Figure 12
Figure 12
Pictures of S. aureus infection for (a) pig skin with a wound without protection and (b) pig skin with a wound protected by a PCl/CS/Clay-3 film.
Figure 13
Figure 13
SEM pictures of (a) the wound sites on the control, (b) a wound under the protection of a PCl/CS/Clay-3 film, and (c) bacteria attached on the surface of PCl/CS/Clay-3. Magnification: 5000× and 20,000×.
Figure 14
Figure 14
OD values of L929 cells after cultivating for 1 day, 3 days, and 5 days.
Figure 15
Figure 15
SEM morphology of L929 cells on the surface of prepared films. (a) PCl/Cur, (b) PCl/CS/Cur, (c) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-1, (d) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-2, (e) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-3, and (f) PCl/CS/Cur/Clay-4. Magnification: 5000×.
Scheme 1
Scheme 1. Schematic Illustration of the Preparation of Cur-Loading with/without Clay-Enhanced Flat Membranes

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