Prospective study of the effect of safety belts on morbidity and health care costs in motor-vehicle accidents

JAMA. 1988 Dec 23-30;260(24):3598-603.

Abstract

To assess the impact of safety belt use on the extent of injuries sustained in motor-vehicle accidents and the incurred health care costs, 1364 patients were prospectively evaluated at four Chicago-area hospitals. Of these, 791 (58%) were wearing a safety belt whereas 573 (42%) were not. The mean injury severity score for safety belt wearers was 1.8 +/- 0.07 vs 4.51 +/- 0.31 in those not wearing a safety belt. Only 6.8% of safety belt wearers required admission vs 19.2% of those not wearing a safety belt. Restrained occupants incurred mean charges of $534 +/- $67 compared with $1583 +/- $201 in unrestrained occupants. Thus, safety belt wearers had a 60.1% reduction in severity of injury, a 64.6% decrease in hospital admissions, and a 66.3% decline in hospital charges. Our findings demonstrate the significant societal burden of nonuse of safety belts in terms of morbidity and the costs of medical care.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Accidents, Traffic / economics*
  • Accidents, Traffic / statistics & numerical data
  • Adult
  • Age Factors
  • Alcohol Drinking
  • Chicago
  • Female
  • Hospitalization / economics*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Prospective Studies
  • Seat Belts / economics*
  • Sex Factors
  • Urban Health
  • Wounds and Injuries / economics
  • Wounds and Injuries / epidemiology
  • Wounds and Injuries / prevention & control*