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, 23 (3), 476

Immunohistochemical and Clinical Significance of Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and Its Inhibitor in Oral Lichen Planus

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Immunohistochemical and Clinical Significance of Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and Its Inhibitor in Oral Lichen Planus

Neha Agarwal et al. J Oral Maxillofac Pathol.

Abstract

Background: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are being considered important mediators in cancer invasion, and plenty of research is in progress. Our objective was to evaluate the presence of MMP-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-2) in oral lichen planus (OLP) and to assess its role in the pathogenesis of OLP and as an indicator of malignant transformation.

Materials and methods: Immunohistochemical analysis for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 was performed in thirty histopathologically confirmed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of OLP (24 cases of reticular and 6 cases of erosive LP). A semi-quantitative analysis was done to assess the expression and distribution of this marker in these lesions.

Results: In all cases of OLP, MMP-2 expression was seen mainly in areas of lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate (100%) in the lamina propria within the overlying epithelium. TIMP-2 expression was seen more than 50% in the fibroblasts and basal and parabasal cells.

Conclusion: The expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 was observed in all cases of OLP. However, a clinical 5-year follow-up of the lesion revealed no progression of the disease except for chronic exacerbation and regression of these lesions. Although our study considers MMP-2 and TIMP-2 as mediators in the pathogenesis of OLP, it still remains debatable whether they have a direct role to play in the disease process or whether they are suitable biomarkers to assess the disease progression.

Keywords: Biomarkers; excision; inflammation; lichen planus; malignancy.

Conflict of interest statement

There are no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Photomicrograph showing hyperplastic parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium with band like lymphocytic infiltration (H&E, ×200)
Figure 2
Figure 2
Positive expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 within the lymphocytes in the lamina propria and sparse staining of keratinocytes within the basal layer and basement membrane (×400)
Figure 3
Figure 3
Positive expression of TIMP-2 within the lymphocytes in the lamina propria and the keratinocytes (×400)
Figure 4
Figure 4
Positive expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 within the endothelial cells in normal buccal mucosa (×200)
Figure 5
Figure 5
Expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 in inflammatory bowel (×400)

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