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, 1 (1), 23-34
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Characteristics of Hyperuricemia in Older Adults in China and Possible Associations With Sarcopenia

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Characteristics of Hyperuricemia in Older Adults in China and Possible Associations With Sarcopenia

Zhe-Rong Xu et al. Aging Med (Milton).

Abstract

Objective: This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the characteristics and epidemiology of hyperuricemia in older adults in China and evaluate possible associations between hyperuricemia and sarcopenia.

Methods: Three hundred and eighty-eight study subjects (>60 years old) meeting the inclusion criteria received blood tests and standardized examinations for bone mineral density, muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance. Data including demographic and clinical characteristic and comorbidity were also collected. All data were analyzed retrospectively.

Results: In the study population, higher uric acid levels were significantly correlated with higher muscle mass, grip strength, and bone density, but were unrelated to physical performance. When uric acid levels were separated into quartiles and the population was divided by sex, the correlation of uric acid to muscle mass was retained in some quartiles for both men and women, and the correlation to handgrip was only retained for one quartile for men. The correlation to bone density was retained in women in all analyses.

Conclusion: In the population as a whole, higher uric acid levels were significantly correlated with higher muscle mass, grip strength, and bone density, but had no relationship to physical performance. Differences between men and women in these relationships need to be studied further.

Keywords: bone mineral density; hyperuricemia; muscle mass; older adults; sarcopenia; uric acid.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have no conflict of interests to disclose.

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