DOES THE 25-OH-VITAMIN D LEVEL AFFECT THE INSULIN RESISTANCE IN THE PATIENTS WITH NON-DIABETIC CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE?

Acta Endocrinol (Buchar). Jul-Sep 2019;15(3):360-363. doi: 10.4183/aeb.2019.360.

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin D deficiency on insulin resistance in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

Materials and method: A total of 104 patients with non-diabetic, stage 2 and 3 chronic kidney disease, who had presented to the outpatient clinic during 2 winters, were included in the study. HOMA-IR rate of > 2.6 was accepted as insulin resistance. Severe 25-OH-vitamin D deficiency was defined as < 10 ng/mL, and 10-30 ng/mL was defined as vitamin D insufficiency. The difference in insulin resistance between the patients determined as having severe vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D insufficiency was investigated.

Results: Severe vitamin D deficiency was observed to be higher among women (61.8% vs. 38.2%), whereas insufficiency was more common among men (63.3% vs. 26.7%, p<0.05). Insulin resistance was observed to be higher in the group with severe deficiency (11.5 vs. 7.82, p<0.05). Insulin resistance was observed in 60% and 36.7% of the groups with severe deficiency and insufficiency, respectively (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Severe vitamin D deficiency had resulted in insulin resistance at a greater rate compared to vitamin D insufficiency in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease (stage 2-3).

Keywords: chronic kidney disease; insulin resistance; vitamin D.

Publication types

  • Editorial