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. 2020 Feb 6;20(3):876.
doi: 10.3390/s20030876.

Assessment of Scapulothoracic, Glenohumeral, and Elbow Motion in Adhesive Capsulitis by Means of Inertial Sensor Technology: A Within-Session, Intra-Operator and Inter-Operator Reliability and Agreement Study

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Free PMC article

Assessment of Scapulothoracic, Glenohumeral, and Elbow Motion in Adhesive Capsulitis by Means of Inertial Sensor Technology: A Within-Session, Intra-Operator and Inter-Operator Reliability and Agreement Study

Liesbet De Baets et al. Sensors (Basel). .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Adhesive capsulitis (AC) is a glenohumeral (GH) joint condition, characterized by decreased GH joint range of motion (ROM) and compensatory ROM in the elbow and scapulothoracic (ST) joint. To evaluate AC progression in clinical settings, objective movement analysis by available systems would be valuable. This study aimed to assess within-session and intra- and inter-operator reliability/agreement of such a motion capture system. The MVN-Awinda® system from Xsens Technologies (Enschede, The Netherlands) was used to assess ST, GH, and elbow ROM during four tasks (GH external rotation, combing hair, grasping a seatbelt, placing a cup on a shelf) in 10 AC patients (mean age = 54 (± 6), 7 females), on two test occasions (accompanied by different operators on second occasion). Standard error of measurements (SEMs) were below 1.5° for ST pro-retraction and 4.6° for GH in-external rotation during GH external rotation; below 6.6° for ST tilt, 6.4° for GH flexion-extension, 7.1° for elbow flexion-extension during combing hair; below 4.4° for GH ab-adduction, 13° for GH in-external rotation, 6.8° for elbow flexion-extension during grasping the seatbelt; below 11° for all ST and GH joint rotations during placing a cup on a shelf. Therefore, to evaluate AC progression, inertial sensors systems can be applied during the execution of functional tasks.

Keywords: adhesive capsulitis; frozen shoulder; kinematic; reliability; scapula; shoulder.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Sensor location and sensor coordinate system.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Motion analysis protocol. (A) Analytical GH external rotation; (B) combing hair; (C) grasping a seatbelt; (D) placing a cup on an overhead shelf. Remark: in (C) the seatbelt is removed to visualize the marker at eye level.

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