Characterizing the vaccine knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and intentions of pregnant women in Georgia and Colorado

Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2020 May 3;16(5):1109-1117. doi: 10.1080/21645515.2020.1717130. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Abstract

Vaccine coverage for maternal vaccines is suboptimal; only about half of pregnant women received influenza and Tdap vaccines in 2018. We explored knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, intentions, and trust regarding maternal and infant vaccines among pregnant women. Between June 2017 and July 2018, we surveyed 2196 pregnant women recruited from geographically and socio-demographically diverse prenatal care practices in Georgia and Colorado (56% response rate). Fifty-six percent of pregnant women intended to receive both influenza and Tdap vaccines during pregnancy and 68% intended to vaccinate their baby with all recommended vaccines on time. Attitudinal constructs associated with intention to vaccinate include confidence in vaccine safety (ORs: 16-38) and efficacy (ORs: 4-19), perceived risk of vaccine-preventable diseases (ORs: 2-6), social norms (ORs: 4-10), and trust in sources of vaccine information. Women pregnant with their first child were less likely than women who had prior children to intend to vaccinate themselves and their children, more likely to be unsure about their intentions to receive both maternal and infant vaccines, and less likely to report feeling they had enough knowledge or information about vaccines and vaccine safety (p < .01). This demonstrates an opportunity for vaccine education to increase vaccine confidence and informed decision-making, especially among first-time pregnant women.

Keywords: maternal and child health; pregnancy; app; cocooning; education; referral; social network; vaccines.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural