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. 2020 Jan;32(1):27-32.
doi: 10.1589/jpts.32.27. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Possible Predictive Formulas for Quantitative and Time-Based Estimation of Muscle Strength During Motion

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Free PMC article

Possible Predictive Formulas for Quantitative and Time-Based Estimation of Muscle Strength During Motion

Umi Matsumura et al. J Phys Ther Sci. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

[Purpose] To examine the validity of the predictive formulas based on the angle information of the segment center of mass and moments of inertia, and to propose a joint moment estimation method. [Participants and Methods] Twenty nine young healthy adults were divided into two groups: the Creation group (20 adults) was needed to create the prediction formulas, and the Verification group (9 adults) was needed to verify the formulas. By monitoring the Creation group, the angular information from inertial motion sensors and moments of inertia of each limb were used to estimate actual ankle joint moment and knee joint moment. Thereafter, the actual joint moments was derived from the Verification group and compared to the predicted values via Pearson correlations. [Results] Good to excellent correlations were obtained between the actual joint moments of the two groups for most of the motions. [Conclusion] It is suggested that the predictive formulas created from the angle information of the segment center of mass and moments of inertia can be used for an approximate estimation of the lower limb joint moments in the sagittal plane and more clinically useful tools need to be considered in the future.

Keywords: Joint moment; Muscle strength; Prediction formulas.

Figures

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.
Wearable inertial motion sensors

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