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, 180 (4), 561-571
[Online ahead of print]

Evaluation of the Association Between Gastric Acid Suppression and Risk of Intestinal Colonization With Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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Evaluation of the Association Between Gastric Acid Suppression and Risk of Intestinal Colonization With Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Roel P J Willems et al. JAMA Intern Med.

Abstract

Importance: Acid suppressants inhibit gastric acid secretion and disrupt the intestinal microbiome. Whether acid suppression increases the risk of colonization with multidrug-resistant microorganisms (MDROs) is unclear.

Objectives: To systematically examine the association of use of acid suppressants with the risk of colonization with MDROs and to perform a meta-analysis of current evidence.

Data sources: PubMed, Embase, the Web of Science Core Collection, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from database inception through July 8, 2019.

Study selection: Study selection was performed independently by 2 authors (R.P.J.W. and C.M.J.E.V.-G.) on the basis of predefined selection criteria; conflicts were resolved by consensus or by an adjudicator (K.v.D.). Human observational studies (case control, cohort, and cross-sectional) and clinical trial designs were selected if they quantified the risk of MDRO colonization in users of acid suppressants in comparison with nonusers.

Data extraction and synthesis: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) recommendations were followed. Data were extracted independently by the same 2 authors, and adjudication was conducted when necessary. Risk of bias was assessed according to a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using random-effects models; heterogeneity was evaluated using the I2 method.

Main outcomes and measures: The primary outcome measure was intestinal colonization with MDROs of the Enterobacterales order (producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases, carbapenemases, or plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases), vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant or vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas or Acinetobacter species.

Results: A total of 26 observational studies including 29 382 patients (11 439 [38.9%] acid suppressant users) met the selection criteria. Primary meta-analysis of 12 studies including 22 305 patients that provided adjusted ORs showed that acid suppression increased the odds of intestinal carriage of MDROs of the Enterobacterales order and of vancomycin-resistant enterococci by roughly 75% (OR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.40-2.16; I2 = 68%). The odds were concordant with the secondary pooled analysis of all 26 studies (OR = 1.70; 95% CI, 1.44-1.99; I2 = 54%). Heterogeneity was partially explained by variations in study setting and the type of acid suppression.

Conclusions and relevance: Acid suppression is associated with increased odds of MDRO colonization. Notwithstanding the limitations of observational studies, the association is plausible and is strengthened by controlling for confounders. In view of the global increase in antimicrobial resistance, stewardship to reduce unnecessary use of acid suppressants may help to prevent MDRO colonization.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.. PRISMA Diagram of Study Selection
CENTRAL indicates Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; CPE, carbapenemase-producing multidrug-resistant microorganisms of the Enterobacterales order; ESBL-E, extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing multidrug-resistant microorganisms of the Enterobacterales order; MDROs, multidrug-resistant microorganisms; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; PRISMA, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses; RCT, randomized clinical trial; VRE, vancomycin-resistant enterococci; VRSA, vancomycin-resistant S aureus. aEndNote software (Clarivate Analytics) was used to remove duplicates. bThe Cohen κ indicated strong agreement for the full-text stage (κ = 0.82). cGoodman et al included carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species in addition to CPE.
Figure 2.
Figure 2.. Forest Plot for the Association of Multidrug-Resistant Microorganism Colonization With Acid Suppression
Odds ratios (ORs) are presented as random effects with inverse variance (except for the log [OR] column). Among studies, acid suppression mainly included exposure to proton pump inhibitors and/or histamine2 receptor antagonists, with few studies including other antacids.
Figure 3.
Figure 3.. Subgroup Analysis by Multidrug-Resistant Microorganism Subtype
A, Multidrug-resistant microorganisms of the Enterobacterales order (MDR-E). B, Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Odds ratios (ORs) are presented as random effects with inverse variance (except for the log [OR] column).
Figure 4.
Figure 4.. Subgroup Analysis by Multidrug-Resistant Microorganism Subtype
A, Carbapenemase-producing multidrug-resistant microorganisms of the Enterobacterales order (CPE). B, Extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing multidrug-resistant microorganisms of the Enterobacterales order (ESBL-E). Odds ratios (ORs) are presented as random effects with inverse variance (except for the log [OR] column).

Comment in

  • JAMA Intern Med. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.0040

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