Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
. 2020 Feb 21;12(2):565.
doi: 10.3390/nu12020565.

Effects of Timing of Acute and Consecutive Catechin Ingestion on Postprandial Glucose Metabolism in Mice and Humans

Affiliations
Free PMC article

Effects of Timing of Acute and Consecutive Catechin Ingestion on Postprandial Glucose Metabolism in Mice and Humans

Masaki Takahashi et al. Nutrients. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

We examined the effects of the timing of acute and consecutive epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and catechin-rich green tea ingestion on postprandial glucose in mice and human adults. In mouse experiments, we compared the effects of EGCG administration early (morning) and late (evening) in the active period on postprandial glucose. In human experiments, participants were randomly assigned to the morning-placebo (MP, n = 10), morning-green tea (MGT, n = 10), evening-placebo (EP, n = 9), and evening-green tea (EGT, n = 9) groups, and consumed either catechin-rich green tea or a placebo beverage for 1 week. At baseline and after 1 week, participants consumed their designated beverages with breakfast (MP and MGT) or supper (EP and EGT). Venous blood samples were collected in the fasted state and 30, 60, 120, and 180 min after each meal. Consecutive administration of EGCG in the evening, but not in the morning, reduced postprandial glucose at 30 (p = 0.006) and 60 (p = 0.037) min in the evening trials in mice. In humans, ingestion of catechin-rich green tea in the evening decreased postprandial glucose (three-factor analysis of variance, p < 0.05). Thus, catechin intake in the evening more effectively suppressed elevation of postprandial glucose.

Keywords: epigallocatechin gallate; glucose metabolism; green tea; insulin; timing.

Conflict of interest statement

Y.M., M.H., and N.O. are employees of Kao Corporation. M.T. (Masaki Takahashi) received a research grant from Kao Research Council for the Study of Healthcare Science. Y.M., M.H., and N.O. were not involved in the interpretation of the results. The rest of the authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Protocol for acute experiments in mice.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Protocol for consecutive experiments in mice.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Concentrations and incremental area under the curve (AUC) of plasma glucose in the morning (A) and evening (B) trials in mice. Data are expressed as the mean and SEM, represented by bidirectional bars. * Mean values were significantly different from that of control group at same time.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Concentrations and incremental area under the curve (AUC) of plasma glucose in the morning groups ((A): morning trials, (B): evening trials) and evening groups ((C): morning trials, (D): evening trials) in mice. Data are expressed as the mean and SEM, represented by bidirectional bars. * Mean values were significantly different from that of control group at same time.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Concentrations and incremental area under the curve (AUC) of plasma insulin in the morning groups ((A): morning trials, (B): evening trials) and evening groups ((C): morning trials, (D): evening trials) in mice. Data are expressed as the mean and SEM, represented by bidirectional bars. * Mean values were significantly different from that of control group at same time.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Fasting and postprandial plasma concentrations of gallocatechin (A), epigallocatechin (B), epigallocatechin gallate (C), gallocatechin gallate (D), epicatechin gallate (E), and catechin gallate (F). Data are expressed as the mean and SEM, represented by bidirectional bars. * Mean values were significantly different from that of MGT group at same meal time (baseline) (p < 0.05), # Mean values were significantly different from that of MGT group at same meal time (after 1 week) (p < 0.05).
Figure 7
Figure 7
Concentrations and incremental area under the curve (AUC) of plasma glucose in the morning groups (A,C) and evening groups (B,D) in humans. Data are expressed as the mean and SEM, represented by bidirectional bars. * Mean values were significantly different from that of MP group at same meal time (baseline) (p < 0.05).
Figure 8
Figure 8
Concentrations and incremental area under the curve (AUC) of plasma insulin in the morning groups (A,C) and evening groups (B,D) in humans. Data are expressed as the mean and SEM, represented by bidirectional bars.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

References

    1. Borch-Johnsen K., Neil A., Balkau B., Larsen S., Nissinen A., Pekkanen J., Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi S., Hiltunen L., Kivela S.L., Tuomilehto J., et al. Diabetes Epidemiology: Collaborative Analysis of Diagnostic criteria in Europe. Lancet. 1999;354:617–621. - PubMed
    1. DECODE Study Group and European Diabetes Epidemiology Group Glucose tolerance and cardiovascular mortality: Comparison of fasting and 2-h diagnostic criteria. Arch. Intern. Med. 2001;161:397–405. doi: 10.1001/archinte.161.3.397. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Nakagami T., Group D.S. Hyperglycaemia and mortality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease in five populations of Asian origin. Diabetologia. 2004;47:385–394. doi: 10.1007/s00125-004-1334-6. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Lopez-Minguez J., Gomez-Abellan P., Garaulet M. Timing of Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner. Effects on Obesity and Metabolic Risk. Nutrients. 2019;11:2624 doi: 10.3390/nu11112624. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
    1. Paoli A., Tinsley G., Bianco A., Moro T. The Influence of Meal Frequency and Timing on Health in Humans: The Role of Fasting. Nutrients. 2019;11:719 doi: 10.3390/nu11040719. - DOI - PMC - PubMed
Feedback