Oxidative-Antioxidant Imbalance and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Schizophrenia

Biomolecules. 2020 Mar 2;10(3):384. doi: 10.3390/biom10030384.

Abstract

Schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder featuring chronic, complex neuropsychiatric features. The etiology and pathogenesis of schizophrenia are not fully understood. Oxidative-antioxidant imbalance is a potential determinant of schizophrenia. Oxidative, nitrosative, or sulfuric damage to enzymes of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as calcium transport and ATP biosynthesis might cause impaired bioenergetics function in the brain. This could explain the initial symptoms, such as the first psychotic episode and mild cognitive impairment. Another concept of the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia is associated with impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance with the activation of the mTOR mitochondrial pathway, which may contribute to impaired neuronal development. Consequently, cognitive processes requiring ATP are compromised and dysfunctions in synaptic transmission lead to neuronal death, preceding changes in key brain areas. This review summarizes the role and mutual interactions of oxidative damage and impaired glucose metabolism as key factors affecting metabolic complications in schizophrenia. These observations may be a premise for novel potential therapeutic targets that will delay not only the onset of first symptoms but also the progression of schizophrenia and its complications.

Keywords: glucose metabolism; mitochondrial dysfunction; reactive oxygen species; schizophrenia.

Publication types

  • Review