Transmission Routes of 2019-nCoV and Controls in Dental Practice

Int J Oral Sci. 2020 Mar 3;12(1):9. doi: 10.1038/s41368-020-0075-9.

Abstract

A novel β-coronavirus (2019-nCoV) caused severe and even fetal pneumonia explored in a seafood market of Wuhan city, Hubei province, China, and rapidly spread to other provinces of China and other countries. The 2019-nCoV was different from SARS-CoV, but shared the same host receptor the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The natural host of 2019-nCoV may be the bat Rhinolophus affinis as 2019-nCoV showed 96.2% of whole-genome identity to BatCoV RaTG13. The person-to-person transmission routes of 2019-nCoV included direct transmission, such as cough, sneeze, droplet inhalation transmission, and contact transmission, such as the contact with oral, nasal, and eye mucous membranes. 2019-nCoV can also be transmitted through the saliva, and the fetal-oral routes may also be a potential person-to-person transmission route. The participants in dental practice expose to tremendous risk of 2019-nCoV infection due to the face-to-face communication and the exposure to saliva, blood, and other body fluids, and the handling of sharp instruments. Dental professionals play great roles in preventing the transmission of 2019-nCoV. Here we recommend the infection control measures during dental practice to block the person-to-person transmission routes in dental clinics and hospitals.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Betacoronavirus* / pathogenicity
  • China
  • Coronavirus Infections* / transmission
  • Dental Care / standards
  • Dental Clinics* / standards
  • Dentists*
  • Disease Outbreaks
  • Health Personnel
  • Humans
  • Infection Control* / methods
  • Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional
  • Pneumonia, Viral* / transmission

Supplementary concepts

  • COVID-19
  • severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2