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. 2020 Mar 21.
doi: 10.1002/lary.28638. Online ahead of print.

Mood Disorders Are Associated With Increased Risk of BPPV: A National Sample Cohort

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Mood Disorders Are Associated With Increased Risk of BPPV: A National Sample Cohort

Sung Kyun Kim et al. Laryngoscope. .

Abstract

Objectives: Few studies have reported that mood disorders increase the risk of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The purpose of our study was to demonstrate whether the incidence of BPPV in those with mood disorders differs from that in a matched control group.

Study design: Nationwide cohort observational study.

Methods: Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service-National Patient Samples were collected from 2002 to 2013. A 1:4 matched mood disorder group (n = 59,340) and control group (n = 237,720) were selected. The crude and adjusted (cerebral stroke, ischemic heart disease, anxiety disorder, and osteoporosis histories) hazard ratios (HRs) for depression and BPPV were analyzed using a stratified Cox proportional hazard model. The results were stratified by age, sex, income, region of residence, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia in these analyses.

Results: The incidence of BPPV was significantly higher in the mood disorder group than in the control group (3.2% vs. 2.1%, P < .001). Mood disorder increased the risk of BPPV (adjusted HR = 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-1.39, P < .001). In subgroup analyses, the incidence of BPPV in all age groups and in both sexes was significantly higher in the mood disorder group than in the control group.

Conclusion: This population-based cohort study demonstrates that mood disorder was significantly associated with BPPV.

Level of evidence: N/A. Laryngoscope, 2020.

Keywords: Mood disorder; benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; cohort study.

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