Different Scan Protocols Affect the Detection Rates of Diabetic Retinopathy Lesions by Wide-Field Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography

Am J Ophthalmol. 2020 Jul;215:72-80. doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2020.03.004. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Abstract

Purpose: To compare different scan protocols of wide-field swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA) for the detection of diabetic retinopathy (DR) lesions.

Design: Comparison of diagnostic approaches.

Methods: A prospective, observational study was conducted at Massachusetts Eye and Ear from December 2018 to July 2019. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR), and diabetic patients without DR were included. All patients were imaged using SS-OCTA using the following scan protocol: 3- × 3-mm Angio centered on the fovea; 6- × 6-mm Angio centered on the fovea and the optic disc; 15- × 9-mm Montage; and 12- × 12-mm Angio centered on the fovea and the optic disc. Images were independently evaluated by 2 graders for the presence or absence of DR lesions including microaneurysms, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities, neovascularization, nonperfusion areas, venous looping, and hard exudates. All statistical analyses were performed using commercial software.

Results: A total of 176 eyes in 119 participants were included in the study. The detection rate of neovascularization on 6- × 6-mm Angio centered on the fovea was approximately one-half that on 15- × 9-mm Montage (P < .05) imaging. Combining 6- × 6-mm Angio imaging centered on the fovea and the optic disc could increase the rate to approximately two-thirds (P < .05). The 12- × 12-mm Angio imaging centered on the combination of fovea and optic disc had detection rates comparable to those of 15- × 9-mm Montage imaging for all DR lesions (P > .05). For microaneurysms, 6- × 6-mm Angio had better performance than 15- × 9-mm Montage (P < .05).

Conclusions: Wide-field SS-OCTA images were useful in detecting DR lesions. The 12- × 12-mm Angio imaging centered on the fovea and on the optic disc may be an optimal balance between speed and efficacy for evaluation of DR in clinical practice.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 / complications
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / complications
  • Diabetic Retinopathy / diagnosis*
  • Female
  • Fluorescein Angiography*
  • Humans
  • Intraocular Pressure / physiology
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prospective Studies
  • Retinal Neovascularization / diagnosis*
  • Retinal Vessels / pathology*
  • Tomography, Optical Coherence*
  • Visual Acuity / physiology