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. 2020 Jan;91(1):e13364.
doi: 10.1111/asj.13364.

Effects of Inoculants on the Fermentation Characteristics and in Vitro Digestibility of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.) Silage on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

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Effects of Inoculants on the Fermentation Characteristics and in Vitro Digestibility of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.) Silage on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

Liangyin Chen et al. Anim Sci J. .

Abstract

To effectively use local available grass resources to cover the winter feed shortage on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, direct-cut and wilted reed canary grass (RCG) silages were prepared by using a rolled-bale system, and their ensiling characteristics and in vitro digestibility were studied. Silages were treated without (control) or with inoculants including LP (Lactobacillus plantarum), LPLB (L. plantarum, L. buchneri), and LPLBc (L. plantarum, L. buchneri, and cellulase), and were stored at ambient temperature (5.7-14.6°C) for 90 days. Compared with control, the inoculated silages increased (p < .05) lactic acid and acetic acid contents, and reduced (p < .05) final pH value and ammonia-N ratio of total N. The highest WSC content (41.2 g/kg DM) occurred for LPLB-inoculated silage, whereas LPLBc-treated silage displayed the lowest contents of NDF (522.9 g/kg DM) and ADF (275.5 g/kg DM). In addition, LPLBc-inoculated silage had the highest in vitro gas production (51.0 ml/g DM), in vitro DM digestibility (619.3 g/kg DM), and metabolic energy (9.6 kJ/kg DM). These results confirmed that treatments with inoculants at ensiling could improve silage fermentation and in vitro digestibility of RCG, and this could be a potential winter feed for animals on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

Keywords: Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau; in vitro gas production; microbial additive; reed canary grass; role bale silage.

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