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Review
. 2020 Mar;12(3):129-141.
doi: 10.14740/jocmr4090. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Dosage, Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol Administration in Adults: A Systematic Review of Human Trials

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Free PMC article
Review

Dosage, Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol Administration in Adults: A Systematic Review of Human Trials

Christian Larsen et al. J Clin Med Res. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Considering data from in vitro and in vivo studies, cannabidiol (CBD) seems to be a promising candidate for the treatment of both somatic and psychiatric disorders. The aim of this review was to collect dose(s), dosage schemes, efficacy and safety reports of CBD use in adults from clinical studies. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library for articles published in English between January 1, 2000 and October 25, 2019. The search terms used were related to cannabis and CBD in adults. We identified 25 studies (927 patients; 538 men and 389 women), of which 22 studies were controlled clinical trials (833 patients) and three were observational designs (94 patients) from five countries. Formulations, dose and dosage schemes varied significantly between studies. Varying effects were identified from the randomized controlled trials (RCTs), more apparent effects from non-RCTs and minor safety issues in general. From the controlled trials, we identified anxiolytic effects with acute CBD administration, and therapeutic effects for social anxiety disorder, psychotic disorder and substance use disorders. In general, studies were heterogeneous and showed substantial risks of bias. Although promising results have been identified, considerable variation in dosage schemes and route of administration were employed across studies. There was evidence to support single dose positive effect on social anxiety disorder, short medium-term effects on symptomatic improvement in schizophrenia and lack of effect in the short medium-term on cognitive functioning in psychotic disorders. Overall, the administration was well tolerated with mild side effects.

Keywords: Cannabidiol; Cannabis; Dose; Efficacy; Safety.

Conflict of interest statement

None to declare.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
PRISMA flow diagram of literature search and selection process. PRISMA: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses.

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